update mingw info
authorUlf Möller <ulf@openssl.org>
Fri, 21 Feb 2003 22:09:52 +0000 (22:09 +0000)
committerUlf Möller <ulf@openssl.org>
Fri, 21 Feb 2003 22:09:52 +0000 (22:09 +0000)
INSTALL.W32

index fd18259..de09fcb 100644 (file)
- INSTALLATION ON THE WIN32 PLATFORM
- ----------------------------------
-
- [Instructions for building for Windows CE can be found in INSTALL.WCE]
-
- Heres a few comments about building OpenSSL in Windows environments.  Most
- of this is tested on Win32 but it may also work in Win 3.1 with some
- modification.
-
- You need Perl for Win32.  Unless you will build on Cygwin, you will need
- ActiveState Perl, available from http://www.activestate.com/ActivePerl.
- For Cygwin users, there's more info in the Cygwin section.
-
- and one of the following C compilers:
-
-  * Visual C++
-  * Borland C
-  * GNU C (Mingw32 or Cygwin)
-
- If you want to compile in the assembly language routines with Visual C++ then
- you will need an assembler. This is worth doing because it will result in
- faster code: for example it will typically result in a 2 times speedup in the
- RSA routines. Currently the following assemblers are supported:
-
-  * Microsoft MASM (aka "ml")
-  * Free Netwide Assembler NASM.
-
- MASM is distributed with most versions of VC++. For the versions where it is
- not included in VC++, it is also distributed with some Microsoft DDKs, for
- example the Windows NT 4.0 DDK and the Windows 98 DDK. If you do not have
- either of these DDKs then you can just download the binaries for the Windows
- 98 DDK and extract and rename the two files XXXXXml.exe and XXXXXml.err, to
- ml.exe and ml.err and install somewhere on your PATH. Both DDKs can be
- downloaded from the Microsoft developers site www.msdn.com.
-
- NASM is freely available. Version 0.98 was used during testing: other versions
- may also work. It is available from many places, see for example:
- http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/devel/nasm/binaries/win32/
- The NASM binary nasmw.exe needs to be installed anywhere on your PATH.
-
- If you are compiling from a tarball or a CVS snapshot then the Win32 files
- may well be not up to date. This may mean that some "tweaking" is required to
- get it all to work. See the trouble shooting section later on for if (when?)
- it goes wrong.
-
- Visual C++
- ----------
-
- Firstly you should run Configure:
-
- > perl Configure VC-WIN32
-
- Next you need to build the Makefiles and optionally the assembly language
- files:
-
- - If you are using MASM then run:
-
-   > ms\do_masm
-
- - If you are using NASM then run:
-
-   > ms\do_nasm
-
- - If you don't want to use the assembly language files at all then run:
-
-   > ms\do_ms
-
- If you get errors about things not having numbers assigned then check the
- troubleshooting section: you probably won't be able to compile it as it
- stands.
-
- Then from the VC++ environment at a prompt do:
-
- > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
-
- If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and executables
- in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
- > cd out32dll
- > ..\ms\test
-
- Tweaks:
-
- There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile environment. By
- default the library is not compiled with debugging symbols. If you add 'debug'
- to the mk1mf.pl lines in the do_* batch file then debugging symbols will be
- compiled in. Note that mk1mf.pl expects the platform to be the last argument
- on the command line, so 'debug' must appear before that, as all other options.
-
- The default Win32 environment is to leave out any Windows NT specific
- features.
-
- If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently only the
- logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch file do_nt.bat
- instead of do_ms.bat.
-
- You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile
- ms\nt.mak
-
- Borland C++ builder 5
- ---------------------
-
- * Configure for building with Borland Builder:
-   > perl Configure BC-32
-
- * Create the appropriate makefile
-   > ms\do_nasm
-
- * Build
-   > make -f ms\bcb.mak
-
- Borland C++ builder 3 and 4
- ---------------------------
-
- * Setup PATH. First must be GNU make then bcb4/bin 
-
- * Run ms\bcb4.bat
-
- * Run make:
-   > make -f bcb.mak
-
- GNU C (Mingw32)
- ---------------
-
- To build OpenSSL, you need the Mingw32 package and GNU make.
-
- * Compiler installation:
-
-   Mingw32 is available from <ftp://ftp.xraylith.wisc.edu/pub/khan/
-   gnu-win32/mingw32/gcc-2.95.2/gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.exe>. Extract it
-   to a directory such as C:\gcc-2.95.2 and add c:\gcc-2.95.2\bin to
-   the PATH environment variable in "System Properties"; or edit and
-   run C:\gcc-2.95.2\mingw32.bat to set the PATH.
-
- * Compile OpenSSL:
-
-   > ms\mingw32
-
-   This will create the library and binaries in out. In case any problems
-   occur, try
-   > ms\mingw32 no-asm
-   instead.
-
-   libcrypto.a and libssl.a are the static libraries. To use the DLLs,
-   link with libeay32.a and libssl32.a instead.
-
-   See troubleshooting if you get error messages about functions not having
-   a number assigned.
-
- * You can now try the tests:
-
-   > cd out
-   > ..\ms\test
-
- GNU C (Cygwin)
- --------------
-
- Cygwin provides a bash shell and GNU tools environment running
- on NT 4.0, Windows 9x, Windows ME, Windows 2000, and Windows XP.
- Consequently, a make of OpenSSL with Cygwin is closer to a GNU
- bash environment such as Linux than to other W32 makes which are
- based on a single makefile approach. Cygwin implements Posix/Unix
- calls through cygwin1.dll, and is contrasted to Mingw32 which links
- dynamically to msvcrt.dll or crtdll.dll.
-
- To build OpenSSL using Cygwin:
-
- * Install Cygwin (see http://cygwin.com/)
-
- * Install Perl and ensure it is in the path (recent Cygwin perl 
-   (version 5.6.1-2 of the latter has been reported to work) or
-   ActivePerl)
-
- * Run the Cygwin bash shell
-
- * $ tar zxvf openssl-x.x.x.tar.gz
-   $ cd openssl-x.x.x
-   $ ./config
-   [...]
-   $ make
-   [...]
-   $ make test
-   $ make install
-
- This will create a default install in /usr/local/ssl.
-
- Cygwin Notes:
-
- "make test" and normal file operations may fail in directories
- mounted as text (i.e. mount -t c:\somewhere /home) due to Cygwin
- stripping of carriage returns. To avoid this ensure that a binary
- mount is used, e.g. mount -b c:\somewhere /home.
-
- "bc" is not provided in older Cygwin distribution.  This causes a
- non-fatal error in "make test" but is otherwise harmless.  If
- desired and needed, GNU bc can be built with Cygwin without change.
-
-
- Installation
- ------------
-
- If you used the Cygwin procedure above, you have already installed and
- can skip this section.  For all other procedures, there's currently no real
- installation procedure for Win32.  There are, however, some suggestions:
-
-    - do nothing.  The include files are found in the inc32/ subdirectory,
-      all binaries are found in out32dll/ or out32/ depending if you built
-      dynamic or static libraries.
-
-    - do as is written in INSTALL.Win32 that comes with modssl:
-
-       $ md c:\openssl 
-       $ md c:\openssl\bin
-       $ md c:\openssl\lib
-       $ md c:\openssl\include
-       $ md c:\openssl\include\openssl
-       $ copy /b inc32\*               c:\openssl\include\openssl
-       $ copy /b out32dll\ssleay32.lib c:\openssl\lib
-       $ copy /b out32dll\libeay32.lib c:\openssl\lib
-       $ copy /b out32dll\ssleay32.dll c:\openssl\bin
-       $ copy /b out32dll\libeay32.dll c:\openssl\bin
-       $ copy /b out32dll\openssl.exe  c:\openssl\bin
-
-      Of course, you can choose another device than c:.  C: is used here
-      because that's usually the first (and often only) harddisk device.
-      Note: in the modssl INSTALL.Win32, p: is used rather than c:.
-
-
- Troubleshooting
- ---------------
-
- Since the Win32 build is only occasionally tested it may not always compile
- cleanly.  If you get an error about functions not having numbers assigned
- when you run ms\do_ms then this means the Win32 ordinal files are not up to
- date. You can do:
-
- > perl util\mkdef.pl crypto ssl update
-
- then ms\do_XXX should not give a warning any more. However the numbers that
- get assigned by this technique may not match those that eventually get
- assigned in the CVS tree: so anything linked against this version of the
- library may need to be recompiled.
-
- If you get errors about unresolved symbols there are several possible
- causes.
-
- If this happens when the DLL is being linked and you have disabled some
- ciphers then it is possible the DEF file generator hasn't removed all
- the disabled symbols: the easiest solution is to edit the DEF files manually
- to delete them. The DEF files are ms\libeay32.def ms\ssleay32.def.
-
- Another cause is if you missed or ignored the errors about missing numbers
- mentioned above.
-
- If you get warnings in the code then the compilation will halt.
-
- The default Makefile for Win32 halts whenever any warnings occur. Since VC++
- has its own ideas about warnings which don't always match up to other
- environments this can happen. The best fix is to edit the file with the
- warning in and fix it. Alternatively you can turn off the halt on warnings by
- editing the CFLAG line in the Makefile and deleting the /WX option.
-
- You might get compilation errors. Again you will have to fix these or report
- them.
-
- One final comment about compiling applications linked to the OpenSSL library.
- If you don't use the multithreaded DLL runtime library (/MD option) your
- program will almost certainly crash because malloc gets confused -- the
- OpenSSL DLLs are statically linked to one version, the application must
- not use a different one.  You might be able to work around such problems
- by adding CRYPTO_malloc_init() to your program before any calls to the
- OpenSSL libraries: This tells the OpenSSL libraries to use the same
- malloc(), free() and realloc() as the application.  However there are many
- standard library functions used by OpenSSL that call malloc() internally
- (e.g. fopen()), and OpenSSL cannot change these; so in general you cannot
- rely on CRYPTO_malloc_init() solving your problem, and you should
- consistently use the multithreaded library.
\r
+ INSTALLATION ON THE WIN32 PLATFORM\r
+ ----------------------------------\r
+\r
+ [Instructions for building for Windows CE can be found in INSTALL.WCE]\r
+\r
+ Heres a few comments about building OpenSSL in Windows environments.  Most\r
+ of this is tested on Win32 but it may also work in Win 3.1 with some\r
+ modification.\r
+\r
+ You need Perl for Win32.  Unless you will build on Cygwin, you will need\r
+ ActiveState Perl, available from http://www.activestate.com/ActivePerl.\r
+ For Cygwin users, there's more info in the Cygwin section.\r
+\r
+ and one of the following C compilers:\r
+\r
+  * Visual C++\r
+  * Borland C\r
+  * GNU C (MinGW or Cygwin)\r
+\r
+ If you want to compile in the assembly language routines with Visual C++ then\r
+ you will need an assembler. This is worth doing because it will result in\r
+ faster code: for example it will typically result in a 2 times speedup in the\r
+ RSA routines. Currently the following assemblers are supported:\r
+\r
+  * Microsoft MASM (aka "ml")\r
+  * Free Netwide Assembler NASM.\r
+\r
+ MASM is distributed with most versions of VC++. For the versions where it is\r
+ not included in VC++, it is also distributed with some Microsoft DDKs, for\r
+ example the Windows NT 4.0 DDK and the Windows 98 DDK. If you do not have\r
+ either of these DDKs then you can just download the binaries for the Windows\r
+ 98 DDK and extract and rename the two files XXXXXml.exe and XXXXXml.err, to\r
+ ml.exe and ml.err and install somewhere on your PATH. Both DDKs can be\r
+ downloaded from the Microsoft developers site www.msdn.com.\r
+\r
+ NASM is freely available. Version 0.98 was used during testing: other versions\r
+ may also work. It is available from many places, see for example:\r
+ http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/devel/nasm/binaries/win32/\r
+ The NASM binary nasmw.exe needs to be installed anywhere on your PATH.\r
+\r
+ If you are compiling from a tarball or a CVS snapshot then the Win32 files\r
+ may well be not up to date. This may mean that some "tweaking" is required to\r
+ get it all to work. See the trouble shooting section later on for if (when?)\r
+ it goes wrong.\r
+\r
+ Visual C++\r
+ ----------\r
+\r
+ Firstly you should run Configure:\r
+\r
+ > perl Configure VC-WIN32\r
+\r
+ Next you need to build the Makefiles and optionally the assembly language\r
+ files:\r
+\r
+ - If you are using MASM then run:\r
+\r
+   > ms\do_masm\r
+\r
+ - If you are using NASM then run:\r
+\r
+   > ms\do_nasm\r
+\r
+ - If you don't want to use the assembly language files at all then run:\r
+\r
+   > ms\do_ms\r
+\r
+ If you get errors about things not having numbers assigned then check the\r
+ troubleshooting section: you probably won't be able to compile it as it\r
+ stands.\r
+\r
+ Then from the VC++ environment at a prompt do:\r
+\r
+ > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak\r
+\r
+ If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and executables\r
+ in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:\r
\r
+ > cd out32dll\r
+ > ..\ms\test\r
+\r
+ Tweaks:\r
+\r
+ There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile environment. By\r
+ default the library is not compiled with debugging symbols. If you add 'debug'\r
+ to the mk1mf.pl lines in the do_* batch file then debugging symbols will be\r
+ compiled in. Note that mk1mf.pl expects the platform to be the last argument\r
+ on the command line, so 'debug' must appear before that, as all other options.\r
+\r
+ The default Win32 environment is to leave out any Windows NT specific\r
+ features.\r
+\r
+ If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently only the\r
+ logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch file do_nt.bat\r
+ instead of do_ms.bat.\r
+\r
+ You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile\r
+ ms\nt.mak\r
+\r
+ Borland C++ builder 5\r
+ ---------------------\r
+\r
+ * Configure for building with Borland Builder:\r
+   > perl Configure BC-32\r
+\r
+ * Create the appropriate makefile\r
+   > ms\do_nasm\r
+\r
+ * Build\r
+   > make -f ms\bcb.mak\r
+\r
+ Borland C++ builder 3 and 4\r
+ ---------------------------\r
+\r
+ * Setup PATH. First must be GNU make then bcb4/bin \r
+\r
+ * Run ms\bcb4.bat\r
+\r
+ * Run make:\r
+   > make -f bcb.mak\r
+\r
+ GNU C (MinGW)\r
+ -------------\r
+\r
+ * Compiler installation:\r
+\r
+   MinGW is available from http://www.mingw.org. Run the installer and\r
+   set the MinGW \bin directory to the PATH in "System Properties" or\r
+   autoexec.bat.\r
+\r
+ * Compile OpenSSL:\r
+\r
+   > ms\mingw32\r
+\r
+   This will create the library and binaries in out. In case any problems\r
+   occur, try\r
+   > ms\mingw32 no-asm\r
+   instead.\r
+\r
+   libcrypto.a and libssl.a are the static libraries. To use the DLLs,\r
+   link with libeay32.a and libssl32.a instead.\r
+\r
+   See troubleshooting if you get error messages about functions not having\r
+   a number assigned.\r
+\r
+ * You can now try the tests:\r
+\r
+   > cd out\r
+   > ..\ms\test\r
+\r
+ GNU C (Cygwin)\r
+ --------------\r
+\r
+ Cygwin provides a bash shell and GNU tools environment running\r
+ on NT 4.0, Windows 9x, Windows ME, Windows 2000, and Windows XP.\r
+ Consequently, a make of OpenSSL with Cygwin is closer to a GNU\r
+ bash environment such as Linux than to other W32 makes which are\r
+ based on a single makefile approach. Cygwin implements Posix/Unix\r
+ calls through cygwin1.dll, and is contrasted to MingW which links\r
+ dynamically to msvcrt.dll or crtdll.dll.\r
+\r
+ To build OpenSSL using Cygwin:\r
+\r
+ * Install Cygwin (see http://cygwin.com/)\r
+\r
+ * Install Perl and ensure it is in the path (recent Cygwin perl \r
+   (version 5.6.1-2 of the latter has been reported to work) or\r
+   ActivePerl)\r
+\r
+ * Run the Cygwin bash shell\r
+\r
+ * $ tar zxvf openssl-x.x.x.tar.gz\r
+   $ cd openssl-x.x.x\r
+   $ ./config\r
+   [...]\r
+   $ make\r
+   [...]\r
+   $ make test\r
+   $ make install\r
+\r
+ This will create a default install in /usr/local/ssl.\r
+\r
+ Cygwin Notes:\r
+\r
+ "make test" and normal file operations may fail in directories\r
+ mounted as text (i.e. mount -t c:\somewhere /home) due to Cygwin\r
+ stripping of carriage returns. To avoid this ensure that a binary\r
+ mount is used, e.g. mount -b c:\somewhere /home.\r
+\r
+ "bc" is not provided in older Cygwin distribution.  This causes a\r
+ non-fatal error in "make test" but is otherwise harmless.  If\r
+ desired and needed, GNU bc can be built with Cygwin without change.\r
+\r
+\r
+ Installation\r
+ ------------\r
+\r
+ If you used the Cygwin procedure above, you have already installed and\r
+ can skip this section.  For all other procedures, there's currently no real\r
+ installation procedure for Win32.  There are, however, some suggestions:\r
+\r
+    - do nothing.  The include files are found in the inc32/ subdirectory,\r
+      all binaries are found in out32dll/ or out32/ depending if you built\r
+      dynamic or static libraries.\r
+\r
+    - do as is written in INSTALL.Win32 that comes with modssl:\r
+\r
+       $ md c:\openssl \r
+       $ md c:\openssl\bin\r
+       $ md c:\openssl\lib\r
+       $ md c:\openssl\include\r
+       $ md c:\openssl\include\openssl\r
+       $ copy /b inc32\*               c:\openssl\include\openssl\r
+       $ copy /b out32dll\ssleay32.lib c:\openssl\lib\r
+       $ copy /b out32dll\libeay32.lib c:\openssl\lib\r
+       $ copy /b out32dll\ssleay32.dll c:\openssl\bin\r
+       $ copy /b out32dll\libeay32.dll c:\openssl\bin\r
+       $ copy /b out32dll\openssl.exe  c:\openssl\bin\r
+\r
+      Of course, you can choose another device than c:.  C: is used here\r
+      because that's usually the first (and often only) harddisk device.\r
+      Note: in the modssl INSTALL.Win32, p: is used rather than c:.\r
+\r
+\r
+ Troubleshooting\r
+ ---------------\r
+\r
+ Since the Win32 build is only occasionally tested it may not always compile\r
+ cleanly.  If you get an error about functions not having numbers assigned\r
+ when you run ms\do_ms then this means the Win32 ordinal files are not up to\r
+ date. You can do:\r
+\r
+ > perl util\mkdef.pl crypto ssl update\r
+\r
+ then ms\do_XXX should not give a warning any more. However the numbers that\r
+ get assigned by this technique may not match those that eventually get\r
+ assigned in the CVS tree: so anything linked against this version of the\r
+ library may need to be recompiled.\r
+\r
+ If you get errors about unresolved symbols there are several possible\r
+ causes.\r
+\r
+ If this happens when the DLL is being linked and you have disabled some\r
+ ciphers then it is possible the DEF file generator hasn't removed all\r
+ the disabled symbols: the easiest solution is to edit the DEF files manually\r
+ to delete them. The DEF files are ms\libeay32.def ms\ssleay32.def.\r
+\r
+ Another cause is if you missed or ignored the errors about missing numbers\r
+ mentioned above.\r
+\r
+ If you get warnings in the code then the compilation will halt.\r
+\r
+ The default Makefile for Win32 halts whenever any warnings occur. Since VC++\r
+ has its own ideas about warnings which don't always match up to other\r
+ environments this can happen. The best fix is to edit the file with the\r
+ warning in and fix it. Alternatively you can turn off the halt on warnings by\r
+ editing the CFLAG line in the Makefile and deleting the /WX option.\r
+\r
+ You might get compilation errors. Again you will have to fix these or report\r
+ them.\r
+\r
+ One final comment about compiling applications linked to the OpenSSL library.\r
+ If you don't use the multithreaded DLL runtime library (/MD option) your\r
+ program will almost certainly crash because malloc gets confused -- the\r
+ OpenSSL DLLs are statically linked to one version, the application must\r
+ not use a different one.  You might be able to work around such problems\r
+ by adding CRYPTO_malloc_init() to your program before any calls to the\r
+ OpenSSL libraries: This tells the OpenSSL libraries to use the same\r
+ malloc(), free() and realloc() as the application.  However there are many\r
+ standard library functions used by OpenSSL that call malloc() internally\r
+ (e.g. fopen()), and OpenSSL cannot change these; so in general you cannot\r
+ rely on CRYPTO_malloc_init() solving your problem, and you should\r
+ consistently use the multithreaded library.\r