Remove mk1mf documentation
authorRichard Levitte <levitte@openssl.org>
Thu, 17 Mar 2016 22:15:12 +0000 (23:15 +0100)
committerRichard Levitte <levitte@openssl.org>
Mon, 21 Mar 2016 10:02:00 +0000 (11:02 +0100)
Reviewed-by: Andy Polyakov <appro@openssl.org>
Configurations/README
NOTES.WIN
ms/README [deleted file]

index 5665d24..a4c1567 100644 (file)
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ In each table entry, the following keys are significant:
                            string in the list is the name of the build
                            scheme.
                            Currently recognised build schemes are
-                           "mk1mf" and "unixmake" and "unified".
+                           "unixmake" and "unified".
                            For the "unified" build scheme, this item
                            *must* be an array with the first being the
                            word "unified" and the second being a word
index af924c8..1c10b75 100644 (file)
--- a/NOTES.WIN
+++ b/NOTES.WIN
@@ -78,6 +78,7 @@
  recognize that binaries targeting Cygwin itself are not interchangeable
  with "conventional" Windows binaries you generate with/for MinGW.
 
+
  GNU C (MinGW/MSYS)
  ------------------
 
    and i686-w64-mingw32-.
 
 
- "Classic" builds (Visual C++)
- ----------------
-
- [OpenSSL was classically built using a script called mk1mf.  This is
-  still available by configuring with --classic.  The notes below are
-  using this flag, and are tentative.  Use with care.
-
-  NOTE: this won't be available for long.]
-
- If you want to compile in the assembly language routines with Visual
- C++, then you will need the Netwide Assembler binary, nasmw.exe or nasm.exe, to
- be available on your %PATH%.
-
- Firstly you should run Configure and generate the Makefiles. If you don't want
- the assembly language files then add the "no-asm" option (without quotes) to
- the Configure lines below.
-
- For Win32:
-
- > perl Configure VC-WIN32 --classic --prefix=c:\some\openssl\dir
- > ms\do_nasm
-
- Note: replace the last line above with the following if not using the assembly
- language files:
-
- > ms\do_ms
-
- For Win64/x64:
-
- > perl Configure VC-WIN64A --classic --prefix=c:\some\openssl\dir
- > ms\do_win64a
-
- For Win64/IA64:
-
- > perl Configure VC-WIN64I --classic --prefix=c:\some\openssl\dir
- > ms\do_win64i
-
- Where the prefix argument specifies where OpenSSL will be installed to.
-
- Then from the VC++ environment at a prompt do the following. Note, your %PATH%
- and other environment variables should be set up for 32-bit or 64-bit
- development as appropriate.
-
- > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
-
- If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and
- executables in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
-
- > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak test
-
- To install OpenSSL to the specified location do:
-
- > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak install
-
- Tweaks:
-
- There are various changes you can make to the Windows compile
- environment. By default the library is not compiled with debugging
- symbols. If you add --debug to the Configure lines above then debugging symbols
- will be compiled in.
-
- By default in 1.1.0 OpenSSL will compile builtin ENGINES into separate shared
- libraries. If you specify the "enable-static-engine" option on the command line
- to Configure the shared library build (ms\ntdll.mak) will compile the engines
- into libcrypto32.dll instead.
-
- You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile
- ms\nt.mak
-
  Linking your application
  ------------------------
 
diff --git a/ms/README b/ms/README
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 7a45db1..0000000
--- a/ms/README
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-Run these makefiles from the top level as in
-nmake -f ms\makefilename
-to build with visual C++ 4.[01].
-
-The results will be in the out directory.
-
-These makefiles and def files were generated my typing
-
-perl util\mk1mf.pl VC-NT >ms/nt.mak
-perl util\mk1mf.pl VC-NT dll >ms/ntdll.mak
-
-perl util\mkdef.pl 32 crypto > ms/crypto32.def
-perl util\mkdef.pl 32 ssl > ms/ssl32.def