Clarify use of |$end0| in stitched x86-64 AES-GCM code.
authorBrian Smith <brian@briansmith.org>
Wed, 2 Mar 2016 06:16:26 +0000 (20:16 -1000)
committerAndy Polyakov <appro@openssl.org>
Mon, 27 Jun 2016 08:15:05 +0000 (10:15 +0200)
There was some uncertainty about what the code is doing with |$end0|
and whether it was necessary for |$len| to be a multiple of 16 or 96.
Hopefully these added comments make it clear that the code is correct
except for the caveat regarding low memory addresses.

Change-Id: Iea546a59dc7aeb400f50ac5d2d7b9cb88ace9027
Reviewed-on: https://boringssl-review.googlesource.com/7194
Reviewed-by: Adam Langley <agl@google.com>
Signed-off-by: Andy Polyakov <appro@openssl.org>
Reviewed-by: Rich Salz <rsalz@openssl.org>
crypto/modes/asm/aesni-gcm-x86_64.pl

index 810876c..5ad62b3 100644 (file)
@@ -116,6 +116,23 @@ _aesni_ctr32_ghash_6x:
          vpxor         $rndkey,$inout3,$inout3
          vmovups       0x10-0x80($key),$T2     # borrow $T2 for $rndkey
        vpclmulqdq      \$0x01,$Hkey,$Z3,$Z2
+
+       # At this point, the current block of 96 (0x60) bytes has already been
+       # loaded into registers. Concurrently with processing it, we want to
+       # load the next 96 bytes of input for the next round. Obviously, we can
+       # only do this if there are at least 96 more bytes of input beyond the
+       # input we're currently processing, or else we'd read past the end of
+       # the input buffer. Here, we set |%r12| to 96 if there are at least 96
+       # bytes of input beyond the 96 bytes we're already processing, and we
+       # set |%r12| to 0 otherwise. In the case where we set |%r12| to 96,
+       # we'll read in the next block so that it is in registers for the next
+       # loop iteration. In the case where we set |%r12| to 0, we'll re-read
+       # the current block and then ignore what we re-read.
+       #
+       # At this point, |$in0| points to the current (already read into
+       # registers) block, and |$end0| points to 2*96 bytes before the end of
+       # the input. Thus, |$in0| > |$end0| means that we do not have the next
+       # 96-byte block to read in, and |$in0| <= |$end0| means we do.
        xor             %r12,%r12
        cmp             $in0,$end0
 
@@ -408,6 +425,9 @@ $code.=<<___;
 .align 32
 aesni_gcm_decrypt:
        xor     $ret,$ret
+
+       # We call |_aesni_ctr32_ghash_6x|, which requires at least 96 (0x60)
+       # bytes of input.
        cmp     \$0x60,$len                     # minimal accepted length
        jb      .Lgcm_dec_abort
 
@@ -462,7 +482,15 @@ $code.=<<___;
        vmovdqu         0x50($inp),$Z3          # I[5]
        lea             ($inp),$in0
        vmovdqu         0x40($inp),$Z0
+
+       # |_aesni_ctr32_ghash_6x| requires |$end0| to point to 2*96 (0xc0)
+       # bytes before the end of the input. Note, in particular, that this is
+       # correct even if |$len| is not an even multiple of 96 or 16. XXX: This
+       # seems to require that |$inp| + |$len| >= 2*96 (0xc0); i.e. |$inp| must
+       # not be near the very beginning of the address space when |$len| < 2*96
+       # (0xc0).
        lea             -0xc0($inp,$len),$end0
+
        vmovdqu         0x30($inp),$Z1
        shr             \$4,$len
        xor             $ret,$ret
@@ -618,6 +646,10 @@ _aesni_ctr32_6x:
 .align 32
 aesni_gcm_encrypt:
        xor     $ret,$ret
+
+       # We call |_aesni_ctr32_6x| twice, each call consuming 96 bytes of
+       # input. Then we call |_aesni_ctr32_ghash_6x|, which requires at
+       # least 96 more bytes of input.
        cmp     \$0x60*3,$len                   # minimal accepted length
        jb      .Lgcm_enc_abort
 
@@ -667,7 +699,16 @@ $code.=<<___;
 .Lenc_no_key_aliasing:
 
        lea             ($out),$in0
+
+       # |_aesni_ctr32_ghash_6x| requires |$end0| to point to 2*96 (0xc0)
+       # bytes before the end of the input. Note, in particular, that this is
+       # correct even if |$len| is not an even multiple of 96 or 16. Unlike in
+       # the decryption case, there's no caveat that |$out| must not be near
+       # the very beginning of the address space, because we know that
+       # |$len| >= 3*96 from the check above, and so we know
+       # |$out| + |$len| >= 2*96 (0xc0).
        lea             -0xc0($out,$len),$end0
+
        shr             \$4,$len
 
        call            _aesni_ctr32_6x