Bring style of INSTALL* documents in sync with README file
authorRalf S. Engelschall <rse@openssl.org>
Mon, 22 Mar 1999 15:36:37 +0000 (15:36 +0000)
committerRalf S. Engelschall <rse@openssl.org>
Mon, 22 Mar 1999 15:36:37 +0000 (15:36 +0000)
and fix some inconsistencies.

INSTALL
INSTALL.W32

diff --git a/INSTALL b/INSTALL
index d72383e..722612b 100644 (file)
--- a/INSTALL
+++ b/INSTALL
@@ -1,76 +1,71 @@
-Installing OpenSSL on Unix
---------------------------
 
 
-[For instructions for compiling OpenSSL on Windows systems, see INSTALL.W32].
+ INSTALLATION ON THE UNIX PLATFORM
+ ---------------------------------
 
 
-To install OpenSSL, you will need:
+ [For instructions for compiling OpenSSL on Windows systems, see INSTALL.W32].
+
+ To install OpenSSL, you will need:
 
   * Perl
   * C compiler
 
   * Perl
   * C compiler
-  * A supported operating system
-
-Quick Start
------------
+  * A supported Unix operating system
 
 
-If you want to just get on with it, do:
+ Quick Start
+ -----------
 
 
-  sh config                      [if this fails, go to step 1b below]
-  make
-  make rehash
-  make test
-  make install
+ If you want to just get on with it, do:
 
 
-This will build and install OpenSSL in the default location, which is
-/usr/local/ssl. If you want to install it anywhere else, do this
-after running `sh config':
+  $ ./config                  [if this fails, go to step 1b below]
+  $ make
+  $ make rehash
+  $ make test
+  $ make install
 
 
-  perl util/ssldir.pl /new/install/path
+ This will build and install OpenSSL in the default location, which is (for
+ historical reasons) /usr/local/ssl. If you want to install it anywhere else,
+ do this after running `sh config':
 
 
-If anything goes wrong, follow the detailed instructions below. If
-your operating system is not (yet) supported by OpenSSL, see the
-section on porting to a new system.
+  $ perl util/ssldir.pl /new/install/path
 
 
-Installation in Detail
-----------------------
+ If anything goes wrong, follow the detailed instructions below. If your
+ operating system is not (yet) supported by OpenSSL, see the section on
+ porting to a new system.
 
 
- 1a. Configure OpenSSL for your operation system automatically
+ Installation in Detail
+ ----------------------
 
 
-     Run
+ 1a. Configure OpenSSL for your operation system automatically:
 
 
-       sh config
+       $ ./config
 
 
-     This guesses at your operating system (and compiler, if
-     necessary) and configures OpenSSL based on this guess. Check the
-     first line of output to see if it guessed correctly. If it did
-     not get it correct or you want to use a different compiler then
-     go to step 1b. Otherwise go to step 2.
+     This guesses at your operating system (and compiler, if necessary) and
+     configures OpenSSL based on this guess. Check the first line of output to
+     see if it guessed correctly. If it did not get it correct or you want to
+     use a different compiler then go to step 1b. Otherwise go to step 2.
 
  1b. Configure OpenSSL for your operating system manually
 
 
  1b. Configure OpenSSL for your operating system manually
 
-     OpenSSL knows about a range of different operating system, hardware
-     and compiler combinations. To see the ones it knows about, run
-
-       ./Configure
+     OpenSSL knows about a range of different operating system, hardware and
+     compiler combinations. To see the ones it knows about, run
 
 
-     Pick a suitable name from the list that matches your system. For
-     most operating systems there is a choice between using "cc" or
-     "gcc".
+       $ ./Configure
 
 
-     When you have identified your system (and if necessary compiler)
-     use this name as the argument to ./Configure. For example, a
-     "linux-elf" user would run:
+     Pick a suitable name from the list that matches your system. For most
+     operating systems there is a choice between using "cc" or "gcc".  When
+     you have identified your system (and if necessary compiler) use this name
+     as the argument to ./Configure. For example, a "linux-elf" user would
+     run:
 
 
-       ./Configure linux-elf
+       ./Configure linux-elf
 
      If your system is not available, you will have to edit the Configure
      program and add the correct configuration for your system.
 
 
      If your system is not available, you will have to edit the Configure
      program and add the correct configuration for your system.
 
-     Configure configures various files by converting an existing .org
-     file into the real file. If you edit any files, remember that if
-     a corresponding .org file exists them the next time you run
-     ./Configure your changes will be lost when the file gets
-     re-created from the .org file. The files that are created from
-     .org files are:
+     Configure configures various files by converting an existing .org file
+     into the real file. If you edit any files, remember that if a
+     corresponding .org file exists them the next time you run ./Configure
+     your changes will be lost when the file gets re-created from the .org
+     file. The files that are created from .org files are:
 
        Makefile.ssl
        crypto/des/des.h
 
        Makefile.ssl
        crypto/des/des.h
@@ -85,71 +80,56 @@ Installation in Detail
 
   2. Set the install directory
 
 
   2. Set the install directory
 
-     If the install directory will be the default of /usr/local/ssl,
-     skip to the next stage. Otherwise, run
+     If the install directory will be the default of /usr/local/ssl, skip to
+     the next stage. Otherwise, run
 
 
-       perl util/ssldir.pl /new/install/path
+        $ perl util/ssldir.pl /new/install/path
 
 
-     This configures the installation location into the "install"
-     target of the top-level Makefile, and also updates some defines
-     in an include file so that the default certificate directory is
-     under the proper installation directory. It also updates a few
-     utility files used in the build process.
+     This configures the installation location into the "install" target of
+     the top-level Makefile, and also updates some defines in an include file
+     so that the default certificate directory is under the proper
+     installation directory. It also updates a few utility files used in the
+     build process.
 
 
-  3. Build OpenSSL
+  3. Build OpenSSL by running:
 
 
-     Now run
+       $ make
 
 
-       make
+     This will build the OpenSSL libraries (libcrypto.a and libssl.a) and the
+     OpenSSL binary ("openssl"). The libraries will be built in the top-level
+     directory, and the binary will be in the "apps" directory.
 
 
-     This will build the OpenSSL libraries (libcrypto.a and libssl.a)
-     and the OpenSSL binary ("openssl"). The libraries will be built
-     in the top-level directory, and the binary will be in the "apps"
-     directory.
+  4. After a successful build, the libraries should be tested. Run:
 
 
-  4. After a successful build, the libraries should be tested. Run
+       $ make rehash
+       $ make test
 
 
-       make rehash
-       make test
-
-     (The first line makes the test certificates in the "certs"
-     directory accessable via an hash name, which is required for some
-     of the tests).
+     (The first line makes the test certificates in the "certs" directory
+     accessable via an hash name, which is required for some of the tests).
 
   5. If everything tests ok, install OpenSSL with
 
 
   5. If everything tests ok, install OpenSSL with
 
-       make install
+       make install
 
 
-     This will create the installation directory (if it does not
-     exist) and then create the following subdirectories:
+     This will create the installation directory (if it does not exist) and
+     then create the following subdirectories:
 
 
-       bin            Contains the openssl binary and a few other utility
-                      programs. It also contains symbolic links so
-                      that openssl commands can be accessed directly
-                      (e.g. so that "s_client" can be used instead of
-                      "openssl s_client").
-       certs          Initially empty, this is the default location
-                      for certificate files.
+       bin            Contains the openssl binary and a few other 
+                      utility programs. 
        include        Contains the header files needed if you want to
                       compile programs with libcrypto or libssl.
        lib            Contains the library files themselves and the
                       OpenSSL configuration file "openssl.cnf".
        include        Contains the header files needed if you want to
                       compile programs with libcrypto or libssl.
        lib            Contains the library files themselves and the
                       OpenSSL configuration file "openssl.cnf".
+       certs          Initially empty, this is the default location
+                      for certificate files.
        private        Initially empty, this is the default location
                       for private key files.
 
        private        Initially empty, this is the default location
                       for private key files.
 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Additional Compilation Notes
-----------------------------
-
-These notes come from SSLeay 0.9.1 and cover some more advanced
-facilities (such as building a single makefile for use on Windows
-systems).
-
 
 
-# Installation of SSLeay.
-# It depends on perl for a few bits but those steps can be skipped and
-# the top level makefile edited by hand
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+The orignal Unix build instructions from SSLeay follow. 
+Note: some of this may be out of date and no longer applicable
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 # When bringing the SSLeay distribution back from the evil intel world
 # of Windows NT, do the following to make it nice again under unix :-)
 
 # When bringing the SSLeay distribution back from the evil intel world
 # of Windows NT, do the following to make it nice again under unix :-)
index 61b563c..8ec2f9f 100644 (file)
-Building OpenSSL under Win32.
+ INSTALLATION ON THE WIN32 PLATFORM
+ ----------------------------------
 
 
-Heres a few comments about building OpenSSL in Windows environments. Most of
-this is tested on Win32 but it may also work in Win 3.1 with some modification.
-See the end of this file for Eric's original comments.
+ Heres a few comments about building OpenSSL in Windows environments. Most of
+ this is tested on Win32 but it may also work in Win 3.1 with some
+ modification.  See the end of this file for Eric's original comments.
 
 
-Note: the default Win32 environment is to leave out any Windows NT specific
-features: (currently only BIO_s_log()) if you want NT specific features see
-the "Tweaks" section later.
+ Note: the default Win32 environment is to leave out any Windows NT specific
+ features: (currently only BIO_s_log()) if you want NT specific features see
+ the "Tweaks" section later.
 
 
-You will need perl for Win32 (which can be got from various sources) and Visual
-C++. 
+ You will need perl for Win32 (which can be got from various sources) and
+ Visual C++. 
 
 
-If you are compiling from a tarball or a CVS snapshot then the Win32 files may
-well be not up to date. This may mean that some "tweaking" is required to get
-it all to work. See the trouble shooting section later on for if (when?) it
-goes wrong.
+ If you are compiling from a tarball or a CVS snapshot then the Win32 files
+ may well be not up to date. This may mean that some "tweaking" is required to
+ get it all to work. See the trouble shooting section later on for if (when?)
+ it goes wrong.
 
 
-Firstly you should run Configure:
+ Firstly you should run Configure:
 
 
-perl Configure VC-WIN32
-
-Then rebuild the Win32 Makefiles and friends:
+ > perl Configure VC-WIN32
 
 
-ms\do_ms
+ Then rebuild the Win32 Makefiles and friends:
 
 
-if you get errors about things not having numbers assigned then check the
-troubleshooting section: you probably wont be able to compile it as it stands.
+ > ms\do_ms
 
 
-then from the VC++ environment at a prompt do:
+ If you get errors about things not having numbers assigned then check the
+ troubleshooting section: you probably wont be able to compile it as it
+ stands.
 
 
-nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
+ Then from the VC++ environment at a prompt do:
 
 
-If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and executables
-in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then cd to out32dll and run ..\ms\test
+ > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
 
 
-Troubleshooting.
+ If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and executables
+ in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
+ > cd out32dll
+ > ..\ms\test
 
 
-Since the Win32 build is only occasionally tested it may not always compile
-cleanly.
+ Troubleshooting
+ ---------------
 
 
-If you get an error about functions not having numbers assigned when you
-run ms\do_ms then this means the Win32 ordinal files are not up to date. You
-can do:
+ Since the Win32 build is only occasionally tested it may not always compile
+ cleanly.  If you get an error about functions not having numbers assigned
+ when you run ms\do_ms then this means the Win32 ordinal files are not up to
+ date. You can do:
 
 
-perl util\mkdef.pl crypto ssl update
+ > perl util\mkdef.pl crypto ssl update
 
 
-then ms\do_ms should not give a warning any more. However the numbers that get
-assigned by this technique may not match those that eventually get assigned
-in the CVS tree: so anything linked against this version of the library
-may need to be recompiled.
+ then ms\do_ms should not give a warning any more. However the numbers that
+ get assigned by this technique may not match those that eventually get
+ assigned in the CVS tree: so anything linked against this version of the
+ library may need to be recompiled.
 
 
-If you get errors about unresolved externals then this means that either you
-didn't read the note above about functions not having numbers assigned or
-someone forgot to add a function to the header file.
+ If you get errors about unresolved externals then this means that either you
+ didn't read the note above about functions not having numbers assigned or
+ someone forgot to add a function to the header file.
 
 
-In this latter case check out the header file to see if the function is defined
-in the header file: it should be defined twice: once with ANSI prototypes and
-once without. If its missing from the non ASNI section then add an entry for
-it: check that ms\do_ms now reports missing numbers and update the numbers as
-above.
+ In this latter case check out the header file to see if the function is
+ defined in the header file: it should be defined twice: once with ANSI
+ prototypes and once without. If its missing from the non ASNI section then
+ add an entry for it: check that ms\do_ms now reports missing numbers and
+ update the numbers as above.
 
 
-If you get warnings in the code then the compilation will halt.
+ If you get warnings in the code then the compilation will halt.
 
 
-The default Makefile for Win32 halts whenever any warnings occur. Since VC++
-has its own ideas about warnings which don't always match up to other
-environments this can happen. The best fix is to edit the file with the warning
-in and fix it. Alternatively you can turn off the halt on warnings by editing
-the CFLAG line in the Makefile and deleting the /WX option.
+ The default Makefile for Win32 halts whenever any warnings occur. Since VC++
+ has its own ideas about warnings which don't always match up to other
+ environments this can happen. The best fix is to edit the file with the
+ warning in and fix it. Alternatively you can turn off the halt on warnings by
+ editing the CFLAG line in the Makefile and deleting the /WX option.
 
 
-You might get compilation errors. Again you will have to fix these or
-report them.
+ You might get compilation errors. Again you will have to fix these or report
+ them.
 
 
-One final comment about compiling applications linked to the OpenSSL library.
-If you don't use the multithreaded DLL runtime library (/MD option) your
-program will almost certainly crash: see the original SSLeay description below
-for more details.
+ One final comment about compiling applications linked to the OpenSSL library.
+ If you don't use the multithreaded DLL runtime library (/MD option) your
+ program will almost certainly crash: see the original SSLeay description
+ below for more details.
 
 
-Tweaks.
+ Tweaks
+ ------
 
 
-There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile environment. If you
-have the MASM assembler 'ml' then you can try the assembly language code. To
-do this remove the 'no-asm' part from do_ms.bat. You can also add 'debug' here
-to make a debugging version of the library.
+ There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile environment. If
+ you have the MASM assembler 'ml' then you can try the assembly language code.
+ To do this remove the 'no-asm' part from do_ms.bat. You can also add 'debug'
+ here to make a debugging version of the library.
 
 
-If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently only
-the logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch file
-do_nt.bat instead of do_ms.bat.
+ If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently only the
+ logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch file do_nt.bat
+ instead of do_ms.bat.
 
 
-You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile ms\nt.mak
+ You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile
+ ms\nt.mak
 
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-The orignal Windows build instructions from SSLeay follow. Note: some of this
-may be out of date and no longer applicable
+The orignal Windows build instructions from SSLeay follow. 
+Note: some of this may be out of date and no longer applicable
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 The Microsoft World.
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 The Microsoft World.