small cosmetics: align title with the other similar manual page
[openssl.git] / doc / crypto / des_modes.pod
index 72a4fd2..e883ca8 100644 (file)
@@ -1,21 +1,16 @@
 =pod
 
 =pod
 
+=for comment openssl_manual_section:7
+
 =head1 NAME
 
 =head1 NAME
 
-Modes of DES and other crypto algorithms of OpenSSL
+des_modes - the variants of DES and other crypto algorithms of OpenSSL
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
-Several crypto algorithms fo OpenSSL can be used in a number of modes.  The
-following text has been written in large parts by Eric Young in his original
-documentation for SSLeay, the predecessor of OpenSSL.  In turn, he attributed
-it to:
-
-       AS 2805.5.2
-       Australian Standard
-       Electronic funds transfer - Requirements for interfaces,
-       Part 5.2: Modes of operation for an n-bit block cipher algorithm
-       Appendix A
+Several crypto algorithms for OpenSSL can be used in a number of modes.  Those
+are used for using block ciphers in a way similar to stream ciphers, among
+other things.
 
 =head1 OVERVIEW
 
 
 =head1 OVERVIEW
 
@@ -172,13 +167,13 @@ only one bit to be in error in the deciphered plaintext.
 
 =item *
 
 
 =item *
 
-OFB mode is not self-synchronising.  If the two operation of
+OFB mode is not self-synchronizing.  If the two operation of
 encipherment and decipherment get out of synchronism, the system needs
 encipherment and decipherment get out of synchronism, the system needs
-to be re-initialised.
+to be re-initialized.
 
 =item *
 
 
 =item *
 
-Each re-initialisation should use a value of the start variable
+Each re-initialization should use a value of the start variable
 different from the start variable values used before with the same
 key.  The reason for this is that an identical bit stream would be
 produced each time from the same parameters.  This would be
 different from the start variable values used before with the same
 key.  The reason for this is that an identical bit stream would be
 produced each time from the same parameters.  This would be
@@ -211,8 +206,8 @@ just one key.
 =item *
 
 If the first and last key are the same, the key length is 112 bits.
 =item *
 
 If the first and last key are the same, the key length is 112 bits.
-There are attacks that could reduce the key space to 55 bit's but it
-requires 2^56 blocks of memory.
+There are attacks that could reduce the effective key strength
+to only slightly more than 56 bits, but these require a lot of memory.
 
 =item *
 
 
 =item *
 
@@ -239,7 +234,22 @@ the same restrictions as for triple ecb mode.
 
 =back
 
 
 =back
 
+=head1 NOTES
+
+This text was been written in large parts by Eric Young in his original
+documentation for SSLeay, the predecessor of OpenSSL.  In turn, he attributed
+it to:
+
+       AS 2805.5.2
+       Australian Standard
+       Electronic funds transfer - Requirements for interfaces,
+       Part 5.2: Modes of operation for an n-bit block cipher algorithm
+       Appendix A
+
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
 L<blowfish(3)|blowfish(3)>, L<des(3)|des(3)>, L<idea(3)|idea(3)>,
 L<rc2(3)|rc2(3)>
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
 L<blowfish(3)|blowfish(3)>, L<des(3)|des(3)>, L<idea(3)|idea(3)>,
 L<rc2(3)|rc2(3)>
+
+=cut
+