Add loaded dynamic ENGINEs to list.
[openssl.git] / doc / apps / config.pod
index ce874a4..ace34b6 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,8 @@
 
 =pod
 
+=for comment openssl_manual_section:5
+
 =head1 NAME
 
 config - OpenSSL CONF library configuration files
@@ -10,7 +12,8 @@ config - OpenSSL CONF library configuration files
 The OpenSSL CONF library can be used to read configuration files.
 It is used for the OpenSSL master configuration file B<openssl.cnf>
 and in a few other places like B<SPKAC> files and certificate extension
-files for the B<x509> utility.
+files for the B<x509> utility. OpenSSL applications can also use the
+CONF library for their own purposes.
 
 A configuration file is divided into a number of sections. Each section
 starts with a line B<[ section_name ]> and ends when a new section is
@@ -51,13 +54,151 @@ or the B<\> character. By making the last character of a line a B<\>
 a B<value> string can be spread across multiple lines. In addition
 the sequences B<\n>, B<\r>, B<\b> and B<\t> are recognized.
 
+=head1 OPENSSL LIBRARY CONFIGURATION
+
+In OpenSSL 0.9.7 and later applications can automatically configure certain
+aspects of OpenSSL using the master OpenSSL configuration file, or optionally
+an alternative configuration file. The B<openssl> utility includes this
+functionality: any sub command uses the master OpenSSL configuration file
+unless an option is used in the sub command to use an alternative configuration
+file.
+
+To enable library configuration the default section needs to contain an 
+appropriate line which points to the main configuration section. The default
+name is B<openssl_conf> which is used by the B<openssl> utility. Other
+applications may use an alternative name such as B<myapplicaton_conf>.
+
+The configuration section should consist of a set of name value pairs which
+contain specific module configuration information. The B<name> represents
+the name of the I<configuration module> the meaning of the B<value> is 
+module specific: it may, for example, represent a further configuration
+section containing configuration module specific information. E.g.
+
+ openssl_conf = openssl_init
+
+ [openssl_init]
+
+ oid_section = new_oids
+ engines = engine_section
+
+ [new_oids]
+
+ ... new oids here ...
+
+ [engine_section]
+
+ ... engine stuff here ...
+
+Currently there are two configuration modules. One for ASN1 objects another
+for ENGINE configuration.
+
+=head2 ASN1 OBJECT CONFIGURATION MODULE
+
+This module has the name B<oid_section>. The value of this variable points
+to a section containing name value pairs of OIDs: the name is the OID short
+and long name, the value is the numerical form of the OID. Although some of
+the B<openssl> utility sub commands already have their own ASN1 OBJECT section
+functionality not all do. By using the ASN1 OBJECT configuration module
+B<all> the B<openssl> utility sub commands can see the new objects as well
+as any compliant applications. For example:
+
+ [new_oids]
+ some_new_oid = 1.2.3.4
+ some_other_oid = 1.2.3.5
+
+In OpenSSL 0.9.8 it is also possible to set the value to the long name followed
+by a comma and the numerical OID form. For example:
+
+ shortName = some object long name, 1.2.3.4
+
+=head2 ENGINE CONFIGURATION MODULE
+
+This ENGINE configuration module has the name B<engines>. The value of this
+variable points to a section containing further ENGINE configuration
+information.
+
+The section pointed to by B<engines> is a table of engine names (though see
+B<engine_id> below) and further sections containing configuration informations
+specific to each ENGINE.
+
+Each ENGINE specific section is used to set default algorithms, load
+dynamic, perform initialization and send ctrls. The actual operation performed
+depends on the I<command> name which is the name of the name value pair. The
+currently supported commands are listed below.
+
+For example:
+
+ [engine_section]
+
+ # Configure ENGINE named "foo"
+ foo = foo_section
+ # Configure ENGINE named "bar"
+ bar = bar_section
+
+ [foo_section]
+ ... foo ENGINE specific commands ...
+
+ [bar_section]
+ ... "bar" ENGINE specific commands ...
+
+The command B<engine_id> is used to give the ENGINE name. If used this 
+command must be first. For example:
+
+ [engine_section]
+ # This would normally handle an ENGINE named "foo"
+ foo = foo_section
+
+ [foo_section]
+ # Override default name and use "myfoo" instead.
+ engine_id = myfoo
+
+The command B<dynamic_path> loads and adds an ENGINE from the given path. It
+is equivalent to sending the ctrls B<SO_PATH> with the path argument followed
+by B<LIST_ADD> with value 2 and B<LOAD> to the dynamic ENGINE. If this is
+not the required behaviour then alternative ctrls can be sent directly
+to the dynamic ENGINE using ctrl commands.
+
+The command B<init> determines whether to initialize the ENGINE. If the value
+is B<0> the ENGINE will not be initialized, if B<1> and attempt it made to
+initialized the ENGINE immediately. If the B<init> command is not present
+then an attempt will be made to initialize the ENGINE after all commands in
+its section have been processed.
+
+The command B<default_algorithms> sets the default algorithms an ENGINE will
+supply using the functions B<ENGINE_set_default_string()>
+
+If the name matches none of the above command names it is assumed to be a
+ctrl command which is sent to the ENGINE. The value of the command is the 
+argument to the ctrl command. If the value is the string B<EMPTY> then no
+value is sent to the command.
+
+For example:
+
+
+ [engine_section]
+
+ # Configure ENGINE named "foo"
+ foo = foo_section
+
+ [foo_section]
+ # Load engine from DSO
+ dynamic_path = /some/path/fooengine.so
+ # A foo specific ctrl.
+ some_ctrl = some_value
+ # Another ctrl that doesn't take a value.
+ other_ctrl = EMPTY
+ # Supply all default algorithms
+ default_algorithms = ALL
+
 =head1 NOTES
 
 If a configuration file attempts to expand a variable that doesn't exist
 then an error is flagged and the file will not load. This can happen
 if an attempt is made to expand an environment variable that doesn't
-exist. For example the default OpenSSL master configuration file used
-the value of B<HOME> which may not be defined on non Unix systems.
+exist. For example in a previous version of OpenSSL the default OpenSSL
+master configuration file used the value of B<HOME> which may not be
+defined on non Unix systems and would cause an error.
 
 This can be worked around by including a B<default> section to provide
 a default value: then if the environment lookup fails the default value