Return per-certificate chain if extra chain is NULL.
[openssl.git] / INSTALL
diff --git a/INSTALL b/INSTALL
index 9cbdfd7..610f7da 100644 (file)
--- a/INSTALL
+++ b/INSTALL
-# Installation of SSLeay.
-# It depends on perl for a few bits but those steps can be skipped and
-# the top level makefile edited by hand
-
-# When bringing the SSLeay distribution back from the evil intel world
-# of Windows NT, do the following to make it nice again under unix :-)
-# You don't normally need to run this.
-sh util/fixNT.sh       # This only works for NT now - eay - 21-Jun-1996
-
-# If you have perl, and it is not in /usr/local/bin, you can run
-perl util/perlpath.pl /new/path
-# and this will fix the paths in all the scripts.  DO NOT put
-# /new/path/perl, just /new/path. The build
-# environment always run scripts as 'perl perlscript.pl' but some of the
-# 'applications' are easier to usr with the path fixed.
-
-# Edit crypto/cryptlib.h, tools/c_rehash, and Makefile.ssl
-# to set the install locations if you don't like
-# the default location of /usr/local/ssl
-# Do this by running
-perl util/ssldir.pl /new/ssl/home
-# if you have perl, or by hand if not.
-
-# If things have been stuffed up with the sym links, run
-make -f Makefile.ssl links
-# This will re-populate lib/include with symlinks and for each
-# directory, link Makefile to Makefile.ssl
-
-# Setup the machine dependent stuff for the top level makefile
-# and some select .h files
-# If you don't have perl, this will bomb, in which case just edit the
-# top level Makefile.ssl
-./Configure 'system type'
-
-# The 'Configure' command contains default configuration parameters
-# for lots of machines.  Configure edits 5 lines in the top level Makefile
-# It modifies the following values in the following files
-Makefile.ssl           CC CFLAG EX_LIBS BN_MULW
-crypto/des/des.h       DES_LONG
-crypto/des/des_locl.h  DES_PTR
-crypto/md/md2.h                MD2_INT
-crypto/rc4/rc4.h       RC4_INT
-crypto/rc4/rc4_enc.c   RC4_INDEX
-crypto/rc2/rc2.h       RC2_INT
-crypto/bf/bf_locl.h    BF_INT
-crypto/idea/idea.h     IDEA_INT
-crypto/bn/bn.h         BN_LLONG (and defines one of SIXTY_FOUR_BIT,
-                                 SIXTY_FOUR_BIT_LONG, THIRTY_TWO_BIT,
-                                 SIXTEEN_BIT or EIGHT_BIT)
-Please remember that all these files are actually copies of the file with
-a .org extention.  So if you change crypto/des/des.h, the next time
-you run Configure, it will be runover by a 'configured' version of
-crypto/des/des.org.  So to make the changer the default, change the .org
-files.  The reason these files have to be edited is because most of
-these modifications change the size of fundamental data types.
-While in theory this stuff is optional, it often makes a big
-difference in performance and when using assember, it is importaint
-for the 'Bignum bits' match those required by the assember code.
-A warning for people using gcc with sparc cpu's.  Gcc needs the -mv8
-flag to use the hardware multiply instruction which was not present in
-earlier versions of the sparc CPU.  I define it by default.  If you
-have an old sparc, and it crashes, try rebuilding with this flag
-removed.  I am leaving this flag on by default because it makes
-things run 4 times faster :-)
-
-# clean out all the old stuff
-make clean
-
-# Do a make depend only if you have the makedepend command installed
-# This is not needed but it does make things nice when developing.
-make depend
-
-# make should build everything
-make
-
-# fix up the demo certificate hash directory if it has been stuffed up.
-make rehash
-
-# test everything
-make test
-
-# install the lot
-make install
-
-# It is worth noting that all the applications are built into the one
-# program, ssleay, which is then has links from the other programs
-# names to it.
-# The applicatons can be built by themselves, just don't define the
-# 'MONOLITH' flag.  So to build the 'enc' program stand alone,
-gcc -O2 -Iinclude apps/enc.c apps/apps.c libcrypto.a
-
-# Other useful make options are
-make makefile.one
-# which generate a 'makefile.one' file which will build the complete
-# SSLeay distribution with temp. files in './tmp' and 'installable' files
-# in './out'
-
-# Have a look at running
-perl util/mk1mf.pl help
-# this can be used to generate a single makefile and is about the only
-# way to generate makefiles for windows.
-
-# There is actually a final way of building SSLeay.
-gcc -O2 -c -Icrypto -Iinclude crypto/crypto.c
-gcc -O2 -c -Issl -Iinclude ssl/ssl.c
-# and you now have the 2 libraries as single object files :-).
-# If you want to use the assember code for your particular platform
-# (DEC alpha/x86 are the main ones, the other assember is just the
-# output from gcc) you will need to link the assember with the above generated
-# object file and also do the above compile as
-gcc -O2 -DBN_ASM -c -Icrypto -Iinclude crypto/crypto.c
-
-This last option is probably the best way to go when porting to another
-platform or building shared libraries.  It is not good for development so
-I don't normally use it.
-
-To build shared libararies under unix, have a look in shlib, basically 
-you are on your own, but it is quite easy and all you have to do
-is compile 2 (or 3) files.
-
-For mult-threading, have a read of doc/threads.doc.  Again it is quite
-easy and normally only requires some extra callbacks to be defined
-by the application.
-The examples for solaris and windows NT/95 are in the mt directory.
-
-have fun
-
-eric 25-Jun-1997
+
+ INSTALLATION ON THE UNIX PLATFORM
+ ---------------------------------
+
+ [Installation on DOS (with djgpp), Windows, OpenVMS, MacOS (before MacOS X)
+  and NetWare is described in INSTALL.DJGPP, INSTALL.W32, INSTALL.VMS,
+  INSTALL.MacOS and INSTALL.NW.
+  
+  This document describes installation on operating systems in the Unix
+  family.]
+
+ To install OpenSSL, you will need:
+
+  * make
+  * Perl 5
+  * an ANSI C compiler
+  * a development environment in form of development libraries and C
+    header files
+  * a supported Unix operating system
+
+ Quick Start
+ -----------
+
+ If you want to just get on with it, do:
+
+  $ ./config
+  $ make
+  $ make test
+  $ make install
+
+ [If any of these steps fails, see section Installation in Detail below.]
+
+ This will build and install OpenSSL in the default location, which is (for
+ historical reasons) /usr/local/ssl. If you want to install it anywhere else,
+ run config like this:
+
+  $ ./config --prefix=/usr/local --openssldir=/usr/local/openssl
+
+
+ Configuration Options
+ ---------------------
+
+ There are several options to ./config (or ./Configure) to customize
+ the build:
+
+  --prefix=DIR  Install in DIR/bin, DIR/lib, DIR/include/openssl.
+               Configuration files used by OpenSSL will be in DIR/ssl
+                or the directory specified by --openssldir.
+
+  --openssldir=DIR Directory for OpenSSL files. If no prefix is specified,
+                the library files and binaries are also installed there.
+
+  no-threads    Don't try to build with support for multi-threaded
+                applications.
+
+  threads       Build with support for multi-threaded applications.
+                This will usually require additional system-dependent options!
+                See "Note on multi-threading" below.
+
+  no-zlib       Don't try to build with support for zlib compression and
+                decompression.
+
+  zlib          Build with support for zlib compression/decompression.
+
+  zlib-dynamic  Like "zlib", but has OpenSSL load the zlib library dynamically
+                when needed.  This is only supported on systems where loading
+                of shared libraries is supported.  This is the default choice.
+
+  no-shared     Don't try to create shared libraries.
+
+  shared        In addition to the usual static libraries, create shared
+                libraries on platforms where it's supported.  See "Note on
+                shared libraries" below.
+
+  no-asm        Do not use assembler code.
+
+  386           Use the 80386 instruction set only (the default x86 code is
+                more efficient, but requires at least a 486). Note: Use
+                compiler flags for any other CPU specific configuration,
+                e.g. "-m32" to build x86 code on an x64 system.
+
+  no-sse2      Exclude SSE2 code pathes. Normally SSE2 extension is
+               detected at run-time, but the decision whether or not the
+               machine code will be executed is taken solely on CPU
+               capability vector. This means that if you happen to run OS
+               kernel which does not support SSE2 extension on Intel P4
+               processor, then your application might be exposed to
+               "illegal instruction" exception. There might be a way
+               to enable support in kernel, e.g. FreeBSD kernel can be
+               compiled with CPU_ENABLE_SSE, and there is a way to
+               disengage SSE2 code pathes upon application start-up,
+               but if you aim for wider "audience" running such kernel,
+               consider no-sse2. Both 386 and no-asm options above imply
+               no-sse2.
+
+  no-<cipher>   Build without the specified cipher (bf, cast, des, dh, dsa,
+                hmac, md2, md5, mdc2, rc2, rc4, rc5, rsa, sha).
+                The crypto/<cipher> directory can be removed after running
+                "make depend".
+
+  -Dxxx, -lxxx, -Lxxx, -fxxx, -mXXX, -Kxxx These system specific options will
+                be passed through to the compiler to allow you to
+                define preprocessor symbols, specify additional libraries,
+                library directories or other compiler options.
+
+
+ Installation in Detail
+ ----------------------
+
+ 1a. Configure OpenSSL for your operation system automatically:
+
+       $ ./config [options]
+
+     This guesses at your operating system (and compiler, if necessary) and
+     configures OpenSSL based on this guess. Run ./config -t to see
+     if it guessed correctly. If you want to use a different compiler, you
+     are cross-compiling for another platform, or the ./config guess was
+     wrong for other reasons, go to step 1b. Otherwise go to step 2.
+
+     On some systems, you can include debugging information as follows:
+
+       $ ./config -d [options]
+
+ 1b. Configure OpenSSL for your operating system manually
+
+     OpenSSL knows about a range of different operating system, hardware and
+     compiler combinations. To see the ones it knows about, run
+
+       $ ./Configure
+
+     Pick a suitable name from the list that matches your system. For most
+     operating systems there is a choice between using "cc" or "gcc".  When
+     you have identified your system (and if necessary compiler) use this name
+     as the argument to ./Configure. For example, a "linux-elf" user would
+     run:
+
+       $ ./Configure linux-elf [options]
+
+     If your system is not available, you will have to edit the Configure
+     program and add the correct configuration for your system. The
+     generic configurations "cc" or "gcc" should usually work on 32 bit
+     systems.
+
+     Configure creates the file Makefile.ssl from Makefile.org and
+     defines various macros in crypto/opensslconf.h (generated from
+     crypto/opensslconf.h.in).
+
+  2. Build OpenSSL by running:
+
+       $ make
+
+     This will build the OpenSSL libraries (libcrypto.a and libssl.a) and the
+     OpenSSL binary ("openssl"). The libraries will be built in the top-level
+     directory, and the binary will be in the "apps" directory.
+
+     If "make" fails, look at the output.  There may be reasons for
+     the failure that aren't problems in OpenSSL itself (like missing
+     standard headers).  If it is a problem with OpenSSL itself, please
+     report the problem to <openssl-bugs@openssl.org> (note that your
+     message will be recorded in the request tracker publicly readable
+     via http://www.openssl.org/support/rt.html and will be forwarded to a
+     public mailing list). Include the output of "make report" in your message.
+     Please check out the request tracker. Maybe the bug was already
+     reported or has already been fixed.
+
+     [If you encounter assembler error messages, try the "no-asm"
+     configuration option as an immediate fix.]
+
+     Compiling parts of OpenSSL with gcc and others with the system
+     compiler will result in unresolved symbols on some systems.
+
+  3. After a successful build, the libraries should be tested. Run:
+
+       $ make test
+
+     If a test fails, look at the output.  There may be reasons for
+     the failure that isn't a problem in OpenSSL itself (like a missing
+     or malfunctioning bc).  If it is a problem with OpenSSL itself,
+     try removing any compiler optimization flags from the CFLAG line
+     in Makefile.ssl and run "make clean; make". Please send a bug
+     report to <openssl-bugs@openssl.org>, including the output of
+     "make report" in order to be added to the request tracker at
+     http://www.openssl.org/support/rt.html.
+
+  4. If everything tests ok, install OpenSSL with
+
+       $ make install
+
+     This will create the installation directory (if it does not exist) and
+     then the following subdirectories:
+
+       certs           Initially empty, this is the default location
+                       for certificate files.
+       man/man1        Manual pages for the 'openssl' command line tool
+       man/man3        Manual pages for the libraries (very incomplete)
+       misc            Various scripts.
+       private         Initially empty, this is the default location
+                       for private key files.
+
+     If you didn't choose a different installation prefix, the
+     following additional subdirectories will be created:
+
+       bin             Contains the openssl binary and a few other 
+                       utility programs. 
+       include/openssl Contains the header files needed if you want to
+                       compile programs with libcrypto or libssl.
+       lib             Contains the OpenSSL library files themselves.
+
+     Use "make install_sw" to install the software without documentation,
+     and "install_docs_html" to install HTML renditions of the manual
+     pages.
+
+     Package builders who want to configure the library for standard
+     locations, but have the package installed somewhere else so that
+     it can easily be packaged, can use
+
+       $ make INSTALL_PREFIX=/tmp/package-root install
+
+     (or specify "--install_prefix=/tmp/package-root" as a configure
+     option).  The specified prefix will be prepended to all
+     installation target filenames.
+
+
+  NOTE: The header files used to reside directly in the include
+  directory, but have now been moved to include/openssl so that
+  OpenSSL can co-exist with other libraries which use some of the
+  same filenames.  This means that applications that use OpenSSL
+  should now use C preprocessor directives of the form
+
+       #include <openssl/ssl.h>
+
+  instead of "#include <ssl.h>", which was used with library versions
+  up to OpenSSL 0.9.2b.
+
+  If you install a new version of OpenSSL over an old library version,
+  you should delete the old header files in the include directory.
+
+  Compatibility issues:
+
+  *  COMPILING existing applications
+
+     To compile an application that uses old filenames -- e.g.
+     "#include <ssl.h>" --, it will usually be enough to find
+     the CFLAGS definition in the application's Makefile and
+     add a C option such as
+
+          -I/usr/local/ssl/include/openssl
+
+     to it.
+
+     But don't delete the existing -I option that points to
+     the ..../include directory!  Otherwise, OpenSSL header files
+     could not #include each other.
+
+  *  WRITING applications
+
+     To write an application that is able to handle both the new
+     and the old directory layout, so that it can still be compiled
+     with library versions up to OpenSSL 0.9.2b without bothering
+     the user, you can proceed as follows:
+
+     -  Always use the new filename of OpenSSL header files,
+        e.g. #include <openssl/ssl.h>.
+
+     -  Create a directory "incl" that contains only a symbolic
+        link named "openssl", which points to the "include" directory
+        of OpenSSL.
+        For example, your application's Makefile might contain the
+        following rule, if OPENSSLDIR is a pathname (absolute or
+        relative) of the directory where OpenSSL resides:
+
+        incl/openssl:
+               -mkdir incl
+               cd $(OPENSSLDIR) # Check whether the directory really exists
+               -ln -s `cd $(OPENSSLDIR); pwd`/include incl/openssl
+
+        You will have to add "incl/openssl" to the dependencies
+        of those C files that include some OpenSSL header file.
+
+     -  Add "-Iincl" to your CFLAGS.
+
+     With these additions, the OpenSSL header files will be available
+     under both name variants if an old library version is used:
+     Your application can reach them under names like <openssl/foo.h>,
+     while the header files still are able to #include each other
+     with names of the form <foo.h>.
+
+
+ Note on multi-threading
+ -----------------------
+
+ For some systems, the OpenSSL Configure script knows what compiler options
+ are needed to generate a library that is suitable for multi-threaded
+ applications.  On these systems, support for multi-threading is enabled
+ by default; use the "no-threads" option to disable (this should never be
+ necessary).
+
+ On other systems, to enable support for multi-threading, you will have
+ to specify at least two options: "threads", and a system-dependent option.
+ (The latter is "-D_REENTRANT" on various systems.)  The default in this
+ case, obviously, is not to include support for multi-threading (but
+ you can still use "no-threads" to suppress an annoying warning message
+ from the Configure script.)
+
+
+ Note on shared libraries
+ ------------------------
+
+ Shared libraries have certain caveats.  Binary backward compatibility
+ can't be guaranteed before OpenSSL version 1.0.  The only reason to
+ use them would be to conserve memory on systems where several programs
+ are using OpenSSL.
+
+ For some systems, the OpenSSL Configure script knows what is needed to
+ build shared libraries for libcrypto and libssl.  On these systems,
+ the shared libraries are currently not created by default, but giving
+ the option "shared" will get them created.  This method supports Makefile
+ targets for shared library creation, like linux-shared.  Those targets
+ can currently be used on their own just as well, but this is expected
+ to change in future versions of OpenSSL.
+
+ Note on random number generation
+ --------------------------------
+
+ Availability of cryptographically secure random numbers is required for
+ secret key generation. OpenSSL provides several options to seed the
+ internal PRNG. If not properly seeded, the internal PRNG will refuse
+ to deliver random bytes and a "PRNG not seeded error" will occur.
+ On systems without /dev/urandom (or similar) device, it may be necessary
+ to install additional support software to obtain random seed.
+ Please check out the manual pages for RAND_add(), RAND_bytes(), RAND_egd(),
+ and the FAQ for more information.
+
+ Note on support for multiple builds
+ -----------------------------------
+
+ OpenSSL is usually built in its source tree.  Unfortunately, this doesn't
+ support building for multiple platforms from the same source tree very well.
+ It is however possible to build in a separate tree through the use of lots
+ of symbolic links, which should be prepared like this:
+
+       mkdir -p objtree/"`uname -s`-`uname -r`-`uname -m`"
+       cd objtree/"`uname -s`-`uname -r`-`uname -m`"
+       (cd $OPENSSL_SOURCE; find . -type f) | while read F; do
+               mkdir -p `dirname $F`
+               rm -f $F; ln -s $OPENSSL_SOURCE/$F $F
+               echo $F '->' $OPENSSL_SOURCE/$F
+       done
+       make -f Makefile.org clean
+
+ OPENSSL_SOURCE is an environment variable that contains the absolute (this
+ is important!) path to the OpenSSL source tree.
+
+ Also, operations like 'make update' should still be made in the source tree.