INSTALL: clarify a bit more how Configure treats "unknown" options
[openssl.git] / INSTALL
diff --git a/INSTALL b/INSTALL
index 29db22e..57e3be2 100644 (file)
--- a/INSTALL
+++ b/INSTALL
@@ -2,9 +2,8 @@
  OPENSSL INSTALLATION
  --------------------
 
- [This document describes installation on all supported operating
-  systems (currently mainly the Linux/Unix family, OpenVMS and
-  Windows)]
+ This document describes installation on all supported operating
+ systems (the Linux/Unix family, OpenVMS and Windows)
 
  To install OpenSSL, you will need:
 
     header files
   * a supported operating system
 
- For additional platform specific requirements and other details,
- please read one of these:
+ For additional platform specific requirements, solutions to specific
issues and other details, please read one of these:
 
+  * NOTES.UNIX (any supported Unix like system)
   * NOTES.VMS (OpenVMS)
   * NOTES.WIN (any supported Windows)
   * NOTES.DJGPP (DOS platform with DJGPP)
 
+ Notational conventions in this document
+ ---------------------------------------
+
+ Throughout this document, we use the following conventions in command
+ examples:
+
+ $ command                      Any line starting with a dollar sign
+                                ($) is a command line.
+
+ { word1 | word2 | word3 }      This denotes a mandatory choice, to be
+                                replaced with one of the given words.
+                                A simple example would be this:
+
+                                $ echo { FOO | BAR | COOKIE }
+
+                                which is to be understood as one of
+                                these:
+
+                                $ echo FOO
+                                - or -
+                                $ echo BAR
+                                - or -
+                                $ echo COOKIE
+
+ [ word1 | word2 | word3 ]      Similar to { word1 | word2 | word3 }
+                                except it's optional to give any of
+                                those.  In addition to the examples
+                                above, this would also be valid:
+
+                                $ echo
+
+ {{ target }}                   This denotes a mandatory word or
+                                sequence of words of some sort.  A
+                                simple example would be this:
+
+                                $ type {{ filename }}
+
+                                which is to be understood to use the
+                                command 'type' on some file name
+                                determined by the user.
+
+ [[ options ]]                  Similar to {{ target }}, but is
+                                optional.
+
+ Note that the notation assumes spaces around {, }, [, ], {{, }} and
+ [[, ]].  This is to differentiate from OpenVMS directory
+ specifications, which also use [ and ], but without spaces.
+
  Quick Start
  -----------
 
@@ -49,7 +97,7 @@
     $ nmake test
     $ nmake install
 
- [If any of these steps fails, see section Installation in Detail below.]
+ If any of these steps fails, see section Installation in Detail below.
 
  This will build and install OpenSSL in the default location, which is:
 
 
   --cross-compile-prefix=PREFIX
                    The PREFIX to include in front of commands for your
-                   toolchain. For example to build the mingw64 target on Linux
-                   you might use "--cross-compile-prefix=x86_64-w64-mingw32-".
-                   If the compiler is gcc, then this will attempt to run
-                   x86_64-w64-mingw32-gcc when compiling.
+                   toolchain. It's likely to have to end with dash, e.g.
+                   a-b-c- would invoke GNU compiler as a-b-c-gcc, etc.
+                   Unfortunately cross-compiling is too case-specific to
+                   put together one-size-fits-all instructions. You might
+                   have to pass more flags or set up environment variables
+                   to actually make it work. Android and iOS cases are
+                   discussed in corresponding Configurations/10-main.cf
+                   sections. But there are cases when this option alone is
+                   sufficient. For example to build the mingw64 target on
+                   Linux "--cross-compile-prefix=x86_64-w64-mingw32-"
+                   works. Naturally provided that mingw packages are
+                   installed. Today Debian and Ubuntu users have option to
+                   install a number of prepackaged cross-compilers along
+                   with corresponding run-time and development packages for
+                   "alien" hardware. To give another example
+                   "--cross-compile-prefix=mipsel-linux-gnu-" suffices
+                   in such case. Needless to mention that you have to
+                   invoke ./Configure, not ./config, and pass your target
+                   name explicitly.
 
   --debug
                    Build OpenSSL with debugging symbols.
   no-err
                    Don't compile in any error strings.
 
+  enable-external-tests
+                   Enable building of integration with external test suites.
+                   This is a developer option and may not work on all platforms.
+                   The only supported external test suite at the current time is
+                   the BoringSSL test suite. See the file test/README.external
+                   for further details.
+
   no-filenames
                    Don't compile in filename and line number information (e.g.
                    for errors and memory allocation).
 
-  enable-fuzz
-                   Build with support for fuzzing. This is a developer option
-                   only. It may not work on all platforms and should never be
-                   used in production environments. See the file fuzz/README.md
-                   for further details.
+  enable-fuzz-libfuzzer, enable-fuzz-afl
+                   Build with support for fuzzing using either libfuzzer or AFL.
+                   These are developer options only. They may not work on all
+                   platforms and should never be used in production environments.
+                   See the file fuzz/README.md for further details.
 
   no-gost
                    Don't build support for GOST based ciphersuites. Note that
                    available if the GOST algorithms are also available through
                    loading an externally supplied engine.
 
-  enable-heartbeats
-                   Build support for DTLS heartbeats.
-
   no-hw-padlock
                    Don't build the padlock engine.
 
                    Don't build SRTP support
 
   no-sse2
-                   Exclude SSE2 code paths. Normally SSE2 extension is
-                   detected at run-time, but the decision whether or not the
-                   machine code will be executed is taken solely on CPU
-                   capability vector. This means that if you happen to run OS
-                   kernel which does not support SSE2 extension on Intel P4
-                   processor, then your application might be exposed to
-                   "illegal instruction" exception. There might be a way
-                   to enable support in kernel, e.g. FreeBSD kernel can be
-                   compiled with CPU_ENABLE_SSE, and there is a way to
-                   disengage SSE2 code paths upon application start-up,
-                   but if you aim for wider "audience" running such kernel,
-                   consider no-sse2. Both the 386 and no-asm options imply
-                   no-sse2.
+                   Exclude SSE2 code paths from 32-bit x86 assembly modules.
+                   Normally SSE2 extension is detected at run-time, but the
+                   decision whether or not the machine code will be executed
+                   is taken solely on CPU capability vector. This means that
+                   if you happen to run OS kernel which does not support SSE2
+                   extension on Intel P4 processor, then your application
+                   might be exposed to "illegal instruction" exception.
+                   There might be a way to enable support in kernel, e.g.
+                   FreeBSD kernel can  be compiled with CPU_ENABLE_SSE, and
+                   there is a way to disengage SSE2 code paths upon application
+                   start-up, but if you aim for wider "audience" running
+                   such kernel, consider no-sse2. Both the 386 and
+                   no-asm options imply no-sse2.
 
   enable-ssl-trace
                    Build with the SSL Trace capabilities (adds the "-trace"
                    the OpenSSL tests also use the command line applications the
                    tests will also be skipped.
 
+  no-tests
+                   Don't build test programs or run any test.
+
   no-threads
                    Don't try to build with support for multi-threaded
                    applications.
                    require additional system-dependent options! See "Note on
                    multi-threading" below.
 
+  enable-tls13downgrade
+                   TODO(TLS1.3): Make this enabled by default and remove the
+                   option when TLSv1.3 is out of draft
+                   TLSv1.3 offers a downgrade protection mechanism. This is
+                   implemented but disabled by default. It should not typically
+                   be enabled except for testing purposes. Otherwise this could
+                   cause problems if a pre-RFC version of OpenSSL talks to an
+                   RFC implementation (it will erroneously be detected as a
+                   downgrade).
+
   no-ts
                    Don't build Time Stamping Authority support.
 
                    where loading of shared libraries is supported.
 
   386
-                   On Intel hardware, use the 80386 instruction set only
-                   (the default x86 code is more efficient, but requires at
-                   least a 486). Note: Use compiler flags for any other CPU
-                   specific configuration, e.g. "-m32" to build x86 code on
-                   an x64 system.
+                   In 32-bit x86 builds, when generating assembly modules,
+                   use the 80386 instruction set only (the default x86 code
+                   is more efficient, but requires at least a 486). Note:
+                   This doesn't affect code generated by compiler, you're
+                   likely to complement configuration command line with
+                   suitable compiler-specific option.
+
+  enable-tls1_3
+                   TODO(TLS1.3): Make this enabled by default
+                   Build support for TLS1.3. Note: This is a WIP feature and
+                   does not currently interoperate with other TLS1.3
+                   implementations! Use with caution!!
 
   no-<prot>
                    Don't build support for negotiating the specified SSL/TLS
   no-<alg>
                    Build without support for the specified algorithm, where
                    <alg> is one of: bf, blake2, camellia, cast, chacha, cmac,
-                   des, dh, dsa, ecdh, ecdsa, idea, md4, md5, mdc2, ocb,
-                   ploy1305, rc2, rc4, rmd160, scrypt, seed or whirlpool. The
+                   des, dh, dsa, ecdh, ecdsa, idea, md4, mdc2, ocb, poly1305,
+                   rc2, rc4, rmd160, scrypt, seed, siphash or whirlpool. The
                    "ripemd" algorithm is deprecated and if used is synonymous
                    with rmd160.
 
-  -Dxxx, -lxxx, -Lxxx, -fxxx, -mXXX, -Kxxx
-                   These system specific options will be passed through to the
-                   compiler to allow you to define preprocessor symbols, specify
-                   additional libraries, library directories or other compiler
-                   options.
+  -Dxxx, lxxx, -Lxxx, -Wl, -rpath, -R, -framework, -static
+                   These system specific options will be recocognised and
+                   passed through to the compiler to allow you to define
+                   preprocessor symbols, specify additional libraries, library
+                   directories or other compiler options. It might be worth
+                   noting that some compilers generate code specifically for
+                   processor the compiler currently executes on. This is not
+                   necessarily what you might have in mind, since it might be
+                   unsuitable for execution on other, typically older,
+                   processor. Consult your compiler documentation.
+
+  -xxx, +xxx
+                   Additional options that are not otherwise recognised are
+                   passed through as they are to the compiler as well.  Again,
+                   consult your compiler documentation.
 
 
  Installation in Detail
 
      NOTE: This is not available on Windows.
 
-       $ ./config [options]                             # Unix
+       $ ./config [[ options ]]                         # Unix
 
        or
 
-       $ @config [options]                              ! OpenVMS
+       $ @config [[ options ]]                          ! OpenVMS
 
      For the remainder of this text, the Unix form will be used in all
      examples, please use the appropriate form for your platform.
 
      On some systems, you can include debugging information as follows:
 
-       $ ./config -d [options]
+       $ ./config -d [[ options ]]
 
  1b. Configure OpenSSL for your operating system manually
 
      as the argument to Configure. For example, a "linux-elf" user would
      run:
 
-       $ ./Configure linux-elf [options]
+       $ ./Configure linux-elf [[ options ]]
 
      If your system isn't listed, you will have to create a configuration
-     file named Configurations/{something}.conf and add the correct
+     file named Configurations/{{ something }}.conf and add the correct
      configuration for your system. See the available configs as examples
      and read Configurations/README and Configurations/README.design for
      more information.
 
        $ mkdir /var/tmp/openssl-build
        $ cd /var/tmp/openssl-build
-       $ /PATH/TO/OPENSSL/SOURCE/config [options]
+       $ /PATH/TO/OPENSSL/SOURCE/config [[ options ]]
 
        or
 
-       $ /PATH/TO/OPENSSL/SOURCE/Configure [target] [options]
+       $ /PATH/TO/OPENSSL/SOURCE/Configure {{ target }} [[ options ]]
 
      OpenVMS example:
 
        $ set default sys$login:
        $ create/dir [.tmp.openssl-build]
        $ set default [.tmp.openssl-build]
-       $ @[PATH.TO.OPENSSL.SOURCE]config {options}
+       $ @[PATH.TO.OPENSSL.SOURCE]config [[ options ]]
 
        or
 
-       $ @[PATH.TO.OPENSSL.SOURCE]Configure {target} {options}
+       $ @[PATH.TO.OPENSSL.SOURCE]Configure {{ target }} [[ options ]]
 
      Windows example:
 
        $ C:
        $ mkdir \temp-openssl
        $ cd \temp-openssl
-       $ perl d:\PATH\TO\OPENSSL\SOURCE\Configure {target} {options}
+       $ perl d:\PATH\TO\OPENSSL\SOURCE\Configure {{ target }} [[ options ]]
 
      Paths can be relative just as well as absolute.  Configure will
      do its best to translate them to relative paths whenever possible.
      ("openssl"). The libraries will be built in the top-level directory,
      and the binary will be in the "apps" subdirectory.
 
-     If the build fails, look at the output.  There may be reasons for
-     the failure that aren't problems in OpenSSL itself (like missing
-     standard headers).  If you are having problems you can get help by
-     sending an email to the openssl-users email list (see
-     https://www.openssl.org/community/mailinglists.html for details). If it
-     is a bug with OpenSSL itself, please report the problem to
-     <rt@openssl.org> (note that your message will be recorded in the request
-     tracker publicly readable at
-     https://www.openssl.org/community/index.html#bugs and will be
-     forwarded to a public mailing list). Please check out the request
-     tracker. Maybe the bug was already reported or has already been
+     If the build fails, look at the output.  There may be reasons
+     for the failure that aren't problems in OpenSSL itself (like
+     missing standard headers).  If you are having problems you can
+     get help by sending an email to the openssl-users email list (see
+     https://www.openssl.org/community/mailinglists.html for details). If
+     it is a bug with OpenSSL itself, please open an issue on GitHub, at
+     https://github.com/openssl/openssl/issues. Please review the existing
+     ones first; maybe the bug was already reported or has already been
      fixed.
 
-     [If you encounter assembler error messages, try the "no-asm"
-     configuration option as an immediate fix.]
+     (If you encounter assembler error messages, try the "no-asm"
+     configuration option as an immediate fix.)
 
      Compiling parts of OpenSSL with gcc and others with the system
      compiler will result in unresolved symbols on some systems.
 
      Please send bug reports to <rt@openssl.org>.
 
+     For more details on how the make variables TESTS can be used,
+     see section TESTS in Detail below.
+
   4. If everything tests ok, install OpenSSL with
 
        $ make install                                   # Unix
                         or libssl.
          lib            Contains the OpenSSL library files.
          lib/engines    Contains the OpenSSL dynamically loadable engines.
-         share/man/{man1,man3,man5,man7}
-                        Contains the OpenSSL man-pages.
-         share/doc/openssl/html/{man1,man3,man5,man7}
+
+         share/man/man1 Contains the OpenSSL command line man-pages.
+         share/man/man3 Contains the OpenSSL library calls man-pages.
+         share/man/man5 Contains the OpenSSL configuration format man-pages.
+         share/man/man7 Contains the OpenSSL other misc man-pages.
+
+         share/doc/openssl/html/man1
+         share/doc/openssl/html/man3
+         share/doc/openssl/html/man5
+         share/doc/openssl/html/man7
                         Contains the HTML rendition of the man-pages.
 
        OpenVMS ('arch' is replaced with the architecture name, "Alpha"
-       or "ia64"):
+       or "ia64", 'sover' is replaced with the shared library version
+       (0101 for 1.1), and 'pz' is replaced with the pointer size
+       OpenSSL was built with):
 
-         [.EXE.'arch']  Contains the openssl binary and a few other
-                        utility scripts.
+         [.EXE.'arch']  Contains the openssl binary.
+         [.EXE]         Contains a few utility scripts.
          [.include.openssl]
                         Contains the header files needed if you want
                         to build your own programs that use libcrypto
                         or libssl.
          [.LIB.'arch']  Contains the OpenSSL library files.
-         [.ENGINES.'arch']
+         [.ENGINES'sover''pz'.'arch']
                         Contains the OpenSSL dynamically loadable engines.
          [.SYS$STARTUP] Contains startup, login and shutdown scripts.
                         These define appropriate logical names and
                         command symbols.
+         [.SYSTEST]     Contains the installation verification procedure.
+         [.HTML]        Contains the HTML rendition of the manual pages.
                         
 
      Additionally, install will add the following directories under
  AR
                 The name of the ar executable to use.
 
+ BUILDFILE
+                Use a different build file name than the platform default
+                ("Makefile" on Unixly platforms, "makefile" on native Windows,
+                "descrip.mms" on OpenVMS).  This requires that there is a
+                corresponding build file template.  See Configurations/README
+                for further information.
+
  CC
                 The compiler to use. Configure will attempt to pick a default
                 compiler for your platform but this choice can be overridden
 
  OPENSSL_LOCAL_CONFIG_DIR
                 OpenSSL comes with a database of information about how it
-                should be built on different platforms. This information is
-                held in ".conf" files in the Configurations directory. See the
+                should be built on different platforms as well as build file
+                templates for those platforms. The database is comprised of
+                ".conf" files in the Configurations directory.  The build
+                file templates reside there as well as ".tmpl" files. See the
                 file Configurations/README for further information about the
-                format of ".conf" files. As well as the standard ".conf" files
-                it is possible to create your own ".conf" files and store them
-                locally, outside the OpenSSL source tree. This environment
-                variable can be set to the directory where these files are held.
+                format of ".conf" files as well as information on the ".tmpl"
+                files.
+                In addition to the standard ".conf" and ".tmpl" files, it is
+                possible to create your own ".conf" and ".tmpl" files and store
+                them locally, outside the OpenSSL source tree. This environment
+                variable can be set to the directory where these files are held
+                and will be considered by Configure before it looks in the
+                standard directories.
 
  PERL
-                The name of the Perl executable to use.
+                The name of the Perl executable to use when building OpenSSL.
+                This variable is used in config script only. Configure on the
+                other hand imposes the interpreter by which it itself was
+                executed on the whole build procedure.
+
+ HASHBANGPERL
+                The command string for the Perl executable to insert in the
+                #! line of perl scripts that will be publically installed.
+                Default: /usr/bin/env perl
+                Note: the value of this variable is added to the same scripts
+                on all platforms, but it's only relevant on Unix-like platforms.
 
  RC
                 The name of the rc executable to use. The default will be as
                 automatically generated files; add new error codes or add new
                 (or change the visibility of) public API functions. (Unix only).
 
+ TESTS in Detail
+ ---------------
+
+ The make variable TESTS supports a versatile set of space separated tokens
+ with which you can specify a set of tests to be performed.  With a "current
+ set of tests" in mind, initially being empty, here are the possible tokens:
+
+ alltests       The current set of tests becomes the whole set of available
+                tests (as listed when you do 'make list-tests' or similar).
+ xxx            Adds the test 'xxx' to the current set of tests.
+ -xxx           Removes 'xxx' from the current set of tests.  If this is the
+                first token in the list, the current set of tests is first
+                assigned the whole set of available tests, effectively making
+                this token equivalent to TESTS="alltests -xxx".
+ nn             Adds the test group 'nn' (which is a number) to the current
+                set of tests.
+ -nn            Removes the test group 'nn' from the current set of tests.
+                If this is the first token in the list, the current set of
+                tests is first assigned the whole set of available tests,
+                effectively making this token equivalent to
+                TESTS="alltests -xxx".
+
+ Also, all tokens except for "alltests" may have wildcards, such as *.
+ (on Unix and Windows, BSD style wildcards are supported, while on VMS,
+ it's VMS style wildcards)
+
+ Example: All tests except for the fuzz tests:
+
+ $ make TESTS=-test_fuzz test
+
+ or (if you want to be explicit)
+
+ $ make TESTS='alltests -test_fuzz' test
+
+ Example: All tests that have a name starting with "test_ssl" but not those
+ starting with "test_ssl_":
+
+ $ make TESTS='test_ssl* -test_ssl_*' test
+
+ Example: Only test group 10:
+
+ $ make TESTS='10'
+
+ Example: All tests except the slow group (group 99):
+
+ $ make TESTS='-99'
+
+ Example: All tests in test groups 80 to 99 except for tests in group 90:
+
+ $ make TESTS='[89]? -90'
+
  Note on multi-threading
  -----------------------
 
  supported. If your platform does not provide pthreads or Windows threads then
  you should Configure with the "no-threads" option.
 
- Note on shared libraries
- ------------------------
+ Notes on shared libraries
+ -------------------------
 
  For most systems the OpenSSL Configure script knows what is needed to
  build shared libraries for libcrypto and libssl. On these systems
  where OpenSSL does not know how to build shared libraries the "no-shared"
  option will be forced and only static libraries will be created.
 
+ Shared libraries are named a little differently on different platforms.
+ One way or another, they all have the major OpenSSL version number as
+ part of the file name, i.e. for OpenSSL 1.1.x, 1.1 is somehow part of
+ the name.
+
+ On most POSIXly platforms, shared libraries are named libcrypto.so.1.1
+ and libssl.so.1.1.
+
+ on Cygwin, shared libraries are named cygcrypto-1.1.dll and cygssl-1.1.dll
+ with import libraries libcrypto.dll.a and libssl.dll.a.
+
+ On Windows build with MSVC or using MingW, shared libraries are named
+ libcrypto-1_1.dll and libssl-1_1.dll for 32-bit Windows, libcrypto-1_1-x64.dll
+ and libssl-1_1-x64.dll for 64-bit x86_64 Windows, and libcrypto-1_1-ia64.dll
+ and libssl-1_1-ia64.dll for IA64 Windows.  With MSVC, the import libraries
+ are named libcrypto.lib and libssl.lib, while with MingW, they are named
+ libcrypto.dll.a and libssl.dll.a.
+
+ On VMS, shareable images (VMS speak for shared libraries) are named
+ ossl$libcrypto0101_shr.exe and ossl$libssl0101_shr.exe.  However, when
+ OpenSSL is specifically built for 32-bit pointers, the shareable images
+ are named ossl$libcrypto0101_shr32.exe and ossl$libssl0101_shr32.exe
+ instead, and when built for 64-bit pointers, they are named
+ ossl$libcrypto0101_shr64.exe and ossl$libssl0101_shr64.exe.
+
  Note on random number generation
  --------------------------------