Set security level to zero is ssltest
[openssl.git] / INSTALL.W32
index 13bbee2..80e5382 100644 (file)
@@ -2,18 +2,34 @@
  INSTALLATION ON THE WIN32 PLATFORM
  ----------------------------------
 
- Heres a few comments about building OpenSSL in Windows environments. Most of
- this is tested on Win32 but it may also work in Win 3.1 with some
- modification.  See the end of this file for Eric's original comments.
+ [Instructions for building for Windows CE can be found in INSTALL.WCE]
+ [Instructions for building for Win64 can be found in INSTALL.W64]
 
- You need Perl for Win32 (available from http://activestate.com/ActivePerl)
- and one of the following C compilers:
+ Here are a few comments about building OpenSSL for Win32 environments,
+ such as Windows NT and Windows 9x. It should be noted though that
+ Windows 9x are not ordinarily tested. Its mention merely means that we
+ attempt to maintain certain programming discipline and pay attention
+ to backward compatibility issues, in other words it's kind of expected
+ to work on Windows 9x, but no regression tests are actually performed.
+
+ On additional note newer OpenSSL versions are compiled and linked with
+ Winsock 2. This means that minimum OS requirement was elevated to NT 4
+ and Windows 98 [there is Winsock 2 update for Windows 95 though].
+
+ - you need Perl for Win32.  Unless you will build on Cygwin, you will need
+   ActiveState Perl, available from http://www.activestate.com/ActivePerl.
+
+ - one of the following C compilers:
 
   * Visual C++
   * Borland C
-  * GNU C (Mingw32 or Cygwin32)
+  * GNU C (Cygwin or MinGW)
 
- If you are compiling from a tarball or a CVS snapshot then the Win32 files
+- Netwide Assembler, a.k.a. NASM, available from http://nasm.sourceforge.net/
+  is required if you intend to utilize assembler modules. Note that NASM
+  is now the only supported assembler.
+
+ If you are compiling from a tarball or a Git snapshot then the Win32 files
  may well be not up to date. This may mean that some "tweaking" is required to
  get it all to work. See the trouble shooting section later on for if (when?)
  it goes wrong.
  Visual C++
  ----------
 
- Firstly you should run Configure and build the Win32 Makefiles:
+ If you want to compile in the assembly language routines with Visual
+ C++, then you will need already mentioned Netwide Assembler binary,
+ nasmw.exe or nasm.exe, to be available on your %PATH%.
+
+ Firstly you should run Configure with platform VC-WIN32:
+
+ > perl Configure VC-WIN32 --prefix=c:\some\openssl\dir
+
+ Where the prefix argument specifies where OpenSSL will be installed to.
+
+ Next you need to build the Makefiles and optionally the assembly
+ language files:
+
+ - If you are using NASM then run:
+
+   > ms\do_nasm
+
+ - If you don't want to use the assembly language files at all then run:
 
- > perl Configure VC-WIN32
- > ms\do_ms
+   > perl Configure VC-WIN32 no-asm --prefix=c:/some/openssl/dir
  > ms\do_ms
 
  If you get errors about things not having numbers assigned then check the
- troubleshooting section: you probably wont be able to compile it as it
+ troubleshooting section: you probably won't be able to compile it as it
  stands.
 
  Then from the VC++ environment at a prompt do:
 
  > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
 
- If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and executables
- in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
+ If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and
executables in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
  
- > cd out32dll
- > ..\ms\test
+ > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak test
+
+
+ To install OpenSSL to the specified location do:
+
+ > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak install
 
  Tweaks:
 
- There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile environment. If
- you have the MASM assembler 'ml' then you can try the assembly language code.
- To do this remove the 'no-asm' part from do_ms.bat. You can also add 'debug'
- here to make a debugging version of the library.
+ There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile
+ environment. By default the library is not compiled with debugging
+ symbols. If you use the platform debug-VC-WIN32 instead of VC-WIN32
+ then debugging symbols will be compiled in.
+
+ By default in 1.0.0 OpenSSL will compile builtin ENGINES into the
+ separate shared librariesy. If you specify the "enable-static-engine"
+ option on the command line to Configure the shared library build
+ (ms\ntdll.mak) will compile the engines into libeay32.dll instead.
 
  The default Win32 environment is to leave out any Windows NT specific
  features.
 
- If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently only the
- logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch file do_nt.bat
- instead of do_ms.bat.
+ If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently
+ only the logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch
file do_nt.bat instead of do_ms.bat.
 
  You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile
  ms\nt.mak
 
+
+ Borland C++ builder 5
+ ---------------------
+
+ * Configure for building with Borland Builder:
+   > perl Configure BC-32
+
+ * Create the appropriate makefile
+   > ms\do_nasm
+
+ * Build
+   > make -f ms\bcb.mak
+
  Borland C++ builder 3 and 4
  ---------------------------
 
  * Run make:
    > make -f bcb.mak
 
- GNU C (Mingw32)
- ---------------
+ GNU C (Cygwin)
+ --------------
+
+ Cygwin implements a Posix/Unix runtime system (cygwin1.dll) on top of
+ Win32 subsystem and provides a bash shell and GNU tools environment.
+ Consequently, a make of OpenSSL with Cygwin is virtually identical to
+ Unix procedure. It is also possible to create Win32 binaries that only
+ use the Microsoft C runtime system (msvcrt.dll or crtdll.dll) using
+ MinGW. MinGW can be used in the Cygwin development environment or in a
+ standalone setup as described in the following section.
 
- To build OpenSSL, you need the Mingw32 package and GNU make.
+ To build OpenSSL using Cygwin:
 
- * Compiler installation:
+ * Install Cygwin (see http://cygwin.com/)
 
-   Mingw32 is available from <ftp://ftp.xraylith.wisc.edu/pub/khan/gnu-win32/
-   mingw32/egcs-1.1.2/egcs-1.1.2-mingw32.zip>. GNU make is at
-   <ftp://agnes.dida.physik.uni-essen.de/home/janjaap/mingw32/binaries/
-   make-3.76.1.zip>. Install both of them in C:\egcs-1.1.2 and run
-   C:\egcs-1.1.2\mingw32.bat to set the PATH.
+ * Install Perl and ensure it is in the path. Both Cygwin perl
+   (5.6.1-2 or newer) and ActivePerl work.
+
+ * Run the Cygwin bash shell
+
+ * $ tar zxvf openssl-x.x.x.tar.gz
+   $ cd openssl-x.x.x
+
+   To build the Cygwin version of OpenSSL:
+
+   $ ./config
+   [...]
+   $ make
+   [...]
+   $ make test
+   $ make install
+
+   This will create a default install in /usr/local/ssl.
+
+   To build the MinGW version (native Windows) in Cygwin:
+
+   $ ./Configure mingw
+   [...]
+   $ make
+   [...]
+   $ make test
+   $ make install
+
+ Cygwin Notes:
+
+ "make test" and normal file operations may fail in directories
+ mounted as text (i.e. mount -t c:\somewhere /home) due to Cygwin
+ stripping of carriage returns. To avoid this ensure that a binary
+ mount is used, e.g. mount -b c:\somewhere /home.
+
+ "bc" is not provided in older Cygwin distribution.  This causes a
+ non-fatal error in "make test" but is otherwise harmless.  If
+ desired and needed, GNU bc can be built with Cygwin without change.
+
+ GNU C (MinGW/MSYS)
+ -------------
+
+ * Compiler and shell environment installation:
+
+   MinGW and MSYS are available from http://www.mingw.org/, both are
+   required. Run the installers and do whatever magic they say it takes
+   to start MSYS bash shell with GNU tools on its PATH.
+
+   N.B. Since source tar-ball can contain symbolic links, it's essential
+   that you use accompanying MSYS tar to unpack the source. It will
+   either handle them in one way or another or fail to extract them,
+   which does the trick too. Latter means that you may safely ignore all
+   "cannot create symlink" messages, as they will be "re-created" at
+   configure stage by copying corresponding files. Alternative programs
+   were observed to create empty files instead, which results in build
+   failure.
 
  * Compile OpenSSL:
 
-   > perl Configure Mingw32
-   > ms\mw.bat
+   $ ./config
+   [...]
+   $ make
+   [...]
+   $ make test
 
-   This will create the library and binaries in out.
+   This will create the library and binaries in root source directory
+   and openssl.exe application in apps directory.
+
+   It is also possible to cross-compile it on Linux by configuring
+   with './Configure --cross-compile-prefix=i386-mingw32- mingw ...'.
+   'make test' is naturally not applicable then.
 
    libcrypto.a and libssl.a are the static libraries. To use the DLLs,
    link with libeay32.a and libssl32.a instead.
 
-   See troubleshooting if you get error messages about functions not having
-   a number assigned.
+   See troubleshooting if you get error messages about functions not
+   having a number assigned.
+
+ Installation
+ ------------
+
+ If you used the Cygwin procedure above, you have already installed and
+ can skip this section.  For all other procedures, there's currently no real
+ installation procedure for Win32.  There are, however, some suggestions:
 
- * You can now try the tests:
+    - do nothing.  The include files are found in the inc32/ subdirectory,
+      all binaries are found in out32dll/ or out32/ depending if you built
+      dynamic or static libraries.
+
+    - do as is written in INSTALL.Win32 that comes with modssl:
+
+       $ md c:\openssl 
+       $ md c:\openssl\bin
+       $ md c:\openssl\lib
+       $ md c:\openssl\include
+       $ md c:\openssl\include\openssl
+       $ copy /b inc32\openssl\*       c:\openssl\include\openssl
+       $ copy /b out32dll\ssleay32.lib c:\openssl\lib
+       $ copy /b out32dll\libeay32.lib c:\openssl\lib
+       $ copy /b out32dll\ssleay32.dll c:\openssl\bin
+       $ copy /b out32dll\libeay32.dll c:\openssl\bin
+       $ copy /b out32dll\openssl.exe  c:\openssl\bin
+
+      Of course, you can choose another device than c:.  C: is used here
+      because that's usually the first (and often only) harddisk device.
+      Note: in the modssl INSTALL.Win32, p: is used rather than c:.
 
-   > cd out
-   > ..\ms\test
 
  Troubleshooting
  ---------------
 
  > perl util\mkdef.pl crypto ssl update
 
- then ms\do_ms should not give a warning any more. However the numbers that
+ then ms\do_XXX should not give a warning any more. However the numbers that
  get assigned by this technique may not match those that eventually get
- assigned in the CVS tree: so anything linked against this version of the
+ assigned in the Git tree: so anything linked against this version of the
  library may need to be recompiled.
 
- If you get errors about unresolved externals then this means that either you
- didn't read the note above about functions not having numbers assigned or
- someone forgot to add a function to the header file.
+ If you get errors about unresolved symbols there are several possible
+ causes.
 
- In this latter case check out the header file to see if the function is
- defined in the header file.
+ If this happens when the DLL is being linked and you have disabled some
+ ciphers then it is possible the DEF file generator hasn't removed all
+ the disabled symbols: the easiest solution is to edit the DEF files manually
+ to delete them. The DEF files are ms\libeay32.def ms\ssleay32.def.
+
+ Another cause is if you missed or ignored the errors about missing numbers
+ mentioned above.
 
  If you get warnings in the code then the compilation will halt.
 
 
  One final comment about compiling applications linked to the OpenSSL library.
  If you don't use the multithreaded DLL runtime library (/MD option) your
- program will almost certainly crash: see the original SSLeay description
- below for more details.
-
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-The orignal Windows build instructions from SSLeay follow. 
-Note: some of this may be out of date and no longer applicable. In particular
-the Crypto_malloc_init() comment appears to be wrong: you always need to use
-the same runtime library as the DLL itself.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-The Microsoft World.
-
-The good news, to build SSLeay for the Microsft World
-
-Windows 3.1 DLL's
-perl Configure VC-WIN16
-nmake -f ms\w31dll.mak
-
-Windows NT/95 DLL's
-perl Configure VC-WIN32
-nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
-
-Now the bad news
-All builds were done using Microsofts Visual C++ 1.52c and [45].x.
-If you are a borland person, you are probably going to have to help me
-finish the stuff in util/pl/BC*pl
-
-All builds were made under Windows NT - this means long filenames, so
-you may have problems under Windows 3.1 but probably not under 95.
-
-Because file pointers don't work in DLL's under Windows 3.1 (well at
-least stdin/stdout don't and I don't like having to differentiate
-between these and other file pointers), I now use the BIO file-pointer
-module, which needs to be linked into your application.  You can either
-use the memory buffer BIO for IO, or compile bss_file.c into your
-application, it is in the apps directory and is just a copy of
-crypto/buffer/bss_file.c with #define APPS_WIN16 added.
-I have not yet automated the makefile to automatically copy it into 'out'
-for a win 3.1 build....
-
-All callbacks passed into SSLeay for Windows 3.1 need to be of type
-_far _loadds.
-
-I don't support building with the pascal calling convention.
-
-The DLL and static builds are large memory model.
-
-To build static libraries for NT/95 or win 3.1
-
-perl util/mk1mf.pl VC-WIN32 > mf-stat.nt
-perl util/mk1mf.pl VC-WIN16 > mf-stat.w31
-for DLL's
-perl util/mk1mf.pl dll VC-WIN32        > mf-dll.nt
-perl util/mk1mf.pl dll VC-WIN16 > mf-dll.w31
-
-Again you will notice that if you dont have perl, you cannot do this.
-
-Now the next importaint issue.  Running Configure!
-I have small assember code files for critical big number library operation
-in crypto/bn/asm.  There is, asm code, object files and uuencode
-object files.  They are
-x86nt32.asm    - 32bit flat memory model assember - suitable Win32
-x86w16.asm     - 16bit assember - used in the msdos build.
-x86w32.asm     - 32bit assember, win 3.1 segments, used for win16 build.
-
-If you feel compelled to build the 16bit maths routines in the windows 3.1
-build,
-perl Configure VC-W31-16
-perl util/mk1mf.pl dll VC-W31-16 > mf-dll.w31
-
-If you hate assember and don't want anything to do with it,
-perl util/mk1mf.pl no-asm VC-WIN16 > mf-dll.w31
-will work for any of the makefile generations.
-
-There are more options to mk1mf.pl but these all leave the temporary
-files in 'tmp' and the output files in 'out' by default.
-
-The NT build is done for console mode.
-
-The Windows 3.1 version of SSLeay uses quickwin, the interface is ugly
-but it is better than nothing.  If you want ugly, try doing anything
-that involves getting a password.  I decided to be ugly instead of
-echoing characters.  For Windows 3.1 I would just sugest using the
-msdos version of the ssleay application for command line work.
-The QuickWin build is primarily for testing.
-
-For both NT and Windows 3.1, I have not written the code so that
-s_client, s_server can take input from the keyboard.  You can happily
-start applications up in separate windows, watch them handshake, and then sit
-there for-ever.  I have not had the time to get this working, and I've
-been able to test things from a unix box to the NT box :-).
-Try running ssleay s_server on the windows box
-(with either -cert ../apps/server.pem -www)
-and run ssleay s_time from another window.
-This often stuffs up on Windows 3.1, but I'm not worried since this is
-probably a problem with my demo applications, not the libraries.
-
-After a build of one of the version of microsoft SSLeay,
-'cd ms' and then run 'test'.  This should check everything out and
-even does a trial run of generating certificates.
-'test.bat' requires that perl be install, you be in the ms directory
-(not the test directory, thats for unix so stay out :-) and that the
-build output directory be ../out 
-
-On a last note, you will probably get division by zero errors and
-stuff after a build.  This is due to your own inability to follow
-instructions :-).
-
-The reasons for the problem is probably one of the following.
-
-1)     You did not run Configure.  This is critical for windows 3.1 when
-       using assember.  The values in crypto/bn/bn.h must match the
-       ones requred for the assember code.  (remember that if you
-       edit crypto/bn/bn.h by hand, it will be clobered the next time
-       you run Configure by the contents of crypto/bn/bn.org).
-       SSLeay version -o will list the compile options.
-       For VC-WIN32 you need bn(64,32) or bn(32,32)
-       For VC-W31-32/VC-WIN16 you need bn(32,32)
-       For VC-W31-16 you need bn(32,16) or bn(16,16)
-       For VC-MSDOS you need bn(32,16) or bn(16,16).
-
-       The first number will be 2 times bigger than the second if
-       BN_LLONG is defined in bn.h and the size of the second number
-       depends on the 'bits' defined at the start of bn.h.  Have a
-       look, it's all reasonably clear.
-       If you want to start messing with 8 bit builds and things like
-       that, build without the assember by re-generating a makefile
-       via 'perl util/mk1mf.pl no-asm'.
-2)     You tried to build under MS-DOS or Windows 3.1 using the /G3
-       option.  Don't.  It is buggy (thats why you just got that
-       error) and unless you want to work out which optimising flag
-       to turn off, I'm not going to help you :-).  I also noticed
-       that code often ran slower when compiled with /G3.
-3)     Under NT/95, malloc goes stupid.  You are probably linking with
-       the wrong library, there are problems if you mix the threaded
-       and non-threaded libraries (due to the DLL being staticly
-       linked with one and the applicaion using another.
-
-Well hopefully thats most of the MS issues handled, see you in ssl-users :-).
-
-eric 30-Aug-1996
-
-SSLeay 0.6.5
-For Windows 95/NT, add CRYPTO_malloc_init() to your program before any
-calls to the SSLeay libraries.  This function will insert callbacks so that
-the SSLeay libraries will use the same malloc(), free() and realloc() as
-your application so 'problem 3)' mentioned above will go away.
-
-There is now DES assember for Windows NT/95.  The file is
-crypto/des/asm/win32.asm and replaces crypto/des/des_enc.c in the build.
-
-There is also Blowfish assember for Windows NT/95.  The file is
-crypto/bf/asm/win32.asm and replaces crypto/bf/bf_enc.c in the build.
-
-eric 25-Jun-1997
-
+ program will almost certainly crash because malloc gets confused -- the
+ OpenSSL DLLs are statically linked to one version, the application must
+ not use a different one.  You might be able to work around such problems
+ by adding CRYPTO_malloc_init() to your program before any calls to the
+ OpenSSL libraries: This tells the OpenSSL libraries to use the same
+ malloc(), free() and realloc() as the application.  However there are many
+ standard library functions used by OpenSSL that call malloc() internally
+ (e.g. fopen()), and OpenSSL cannot change these; so in general you cannot
+ rely on CRYPTO_malloc_init() solving your problem, and you should
+ consistently use the multithreaded library.
+
+ Linking your application
+ ------------------------
+
+ If you link with static OpenSSL libraries [those built with ms/nt.mak],
+ then you're expected to additionally link your application with
+ WS2_32.LIB, ADVAPI32.LIB, GDI32.LIB and USER32.LIB. Those developing
+ non-interactive service applications might feel concerned about linking
+ with the latter two, as they are justly associated with interactive
+ desktop, which is not available to service processes. The toolkit is
+ designed to detect in which context it's currently executed, GUI,
+ console app or service, and act accordingly, namely whether or not to
+ actually make GUI calls. Additionally those who wish to
+ /DELAYLOAD:GDI32.DLL and /DELAYLOAD:USER32.DLL and actually keep them
+ off service process should consider implementing and exporting from
+ .exe image in question own _OPENSSL_isservice not relying on USER32.DLL.
+ E.g., on Windows Vista and later you could:
+
+       __declspec(dllexport) __cdecl BOOL _OPENSSL_isservice(void)
+       {   DWORD sess;
+           if (ProcessIdToSessionId(GetCurrentProcessId(),&sess))
+               return sess==0;
+           return FALSE;
+       }
+
+ If you link with OpenSSL .DLLs, then you're expected to include into
+ your application code small "shim" snippet, which provides glue between
+ OpenSSL BIO layer and your compiler run-time. Look up OPENSSL_Applink
+ reference page for further details.