Fixes for dgst tool. Initialize md_name, sig_name properly. Return error code
[openssl.git] / INSTALL.W32
index 8a875cf..76beee3 100644 (file)
@@ -3,40 +3,31 @@
  ----------------------------------
 
  [Instructions for building for Windows CE can be found in INSTALL.WCE]
+ [Instructions for building for Win64 can be found in INSTALL.W64]
 
- Heres a few comments about building OpenSSL in Windows environments.  Most
- of this is tested on Win32 but it may also work in Win 3.1 with some
- modification.
+ Here are a few comments about building OpenSSL for Win32 environments,
+ such as Windows NT and Windows 9x. It should be noted though that
+ Windows 9x are not ordinarily tested. Its mention merely means that we
+ attempt to maintain certain programming discipline and pay attention
+ to backward compatibility issues, in other words it's kind of expected
+ to work on Windows 9x, but no regression tests are actually performed.
 
- You need Perl for Win32.  Unless you will build on Cygwin, you will need
- ActiveState Perl, available from http://www.activestate.com/ActivePerl.
For Cygwin users, there's more info in the Cygwin section.
+ On additional note newer OpenSSL versions are compiled and linked with
+ Winsock 2. This means that minimum OS requirement was elevated to NT 4
and Windows 98 [there is Winsock 2 update for Windows 95 though].
 
- and one of the following C compilers:
+ - you need Perl for Win32.  Unless you will build on Cygwin, you will need
+   ActiveState Perl, available from http://www.activestate.com/ActivePerl.
+
+ - one of the following C compilers:
 
   * Visual C++
   * Borland C
-  * GNU C (Mingw32 or Cygwin)
-
- If you want to compile in the assembly language routines with Visual C++ then
- you will need an assembler. This is worth doing because it will result in
- faster code: for example it will typically result in a 2 times speedup in the
- RSA routines. Currently the following assemblers are supported:
-
-  * Microsoft MASM (aka "ml")
-  * Free Netwide Assembler NASM.
-
- MASM was at one point distributed with VC++. It is now distributed with some
- Microsoft DDKs, for example the Windows NT 4.0 DDK and the Windows 98 DDK. If
- you do not have either of these DDKs then you can just download the binaries
- for the Windows 98 DDK and extract and rename the two files XXXXXml.exe and
- XXXXXml.err, to ml.exe and ml.err and install somewhere on your PATH. Both
- DDKs can be downloaded from the Microsoft developers site www.msdn.com.
+  * GNU C (Cygwin or MinGW)
 
- NASM is freely available. Version 0.98 was used during testing: other versions
- may also work. It is available from many places, see for example:
- http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/devel/nasm/binaries/win32/
- The NASM binary nasmw.exe needs to be installed anywhere on your PATH.
+- even though optional for non-gcc builds, Netwide Assembler, a.k.a.
+  NASM, available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/nasm is
+  recommended.
 
  If you are compiling from a tarball or a CVS snapshot then the Win32 files
  may well be not up to date. This may mean that some "tweaking" is required to
  Visual C++
  ----------
 
- Firstly you should run Configure:
+ If you want to compile in the assembly language routines with Visual
+ C++, then you will need already mentioned Netwide Assembler binary,
+ nasmw.exe, to be available on your %PATH%.
 
- > perl Configure VC-WIN32
+ Firstly you should run Configure:
 
- Next you need to build the Makefiles and optionally the assembly language
- files:
+ > perl Configure VC-WIN32 --prefix=c:/some/openssl/dir
 
- - If you are using MASM then run:
+ Where the prefix argument specifies where OpenSSL will be installed to.
 
-   > ms\do_masm
+ Next you need to build the Makefiles and optionally the assembly
+ language files:
 
  - If you are using NASM then run:
 
 
  > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
 
- If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and executables
- in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
+ If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and
executables in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
  
- > cd out32dll
- > ..\ms\test
+ > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak test
+
+
+ To install OpenSSL to the specified location do:
+
+ > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak install
 
  Tweaks:
 
- There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile environment. By
- default the library is not compiled with debugging symbols. If you add 'debug'
- to the mk1mf.pl lines in the do_* batch file then debugging symbols will be
- compiled in. Note that mk1mf.pl expects the platform to be the last argument
- on the command line, so 'debug' must appear before that, as all other options.
+ There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile
+ environment. By default the library is not compiled with debugging
+ symbols. If you add 'debug' to the mk1mf.pl lines in the do_* batch
+ file then debugging symbols will be compiled in. Note that mk1mf.pl
+ expects the platform to be the last argument on the command line, so
+ 'debug' must appear before that, as all other options.
+
+
+ By default in 0.9.8 OpenSSL will compile builtin ENGINES into the
+ libeay32.dll shared library. If you specify the "no-static-engine"
+ option on the command line to Configure the shared library build
+ (ms\ntdll.mak) will compile the engines as separate DLLs.
 
  The default Win32 environment is to leave out any Windows NT specific
  features.
 
- If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently only the
- logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch file do_nt.bat
- instead of do_ms.bat.
+ If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently
+ only the logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch
file do_nt.bat instead of do_ms.bat.
 
  You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile
  ms\nt.mak
 
+
+
  Borland C++ builder 5
  ---------------------
 
  * Run make:
    > make -f bcb.mak
 
- GNU C (Mingw32)
- ---------------
-
- To build OpenSSL, you need the Mingw32 package and GNU make.
-
- * Compiler installation:
-
-   Mingw32 is available from <ftp://ftp.xraylith.wisc.edu/pub/khan/
-   gnu-win32/mingw32/gcc-2.95.2/gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.exe>. Extract it
-   to a directory such as C:\gcc-2.95.2 and add c:\gcc-2.95.2\bin to
-   the PATH environment variable in "System Properties"; or edit and
-   run C:\gcc-2.95.2\mingw32.bat to set the PATH.
-
- * Compile OpenSSL:
-
-   > ms\mingw32
-
-   This will create the library and binaries in out. In case any problems
-   occur, try
-   > ms\mingw32 no-asm
-   instead.
-
-   libcrypto.a and libssl.a are the static libraries. To use the DLLs,
-   link with libeay32.a and libssl32.a instead.
-
-   See troubleshooting if you get error messages about functions not having
-   a number assigned.
-
- * You can now try the tests:
-
-   > cd out
-   > ..\ms\test
-
  GNU C (Cygwin)
  --------------
 
- Cygwin provides a bash shell and GNU tools environment running
on NT 4.0, Windows 9x, Windows ME, Windows 2000, and Windows XP.
- Consequently, a make of OpenSSL with Cygwin is closer to a GNU
- bash environment such as Linux than to other W32 makes which are
- based on a single makefile approach. Cygwin implements Posix/Unix
- calls through cygwin1.dll, and is contrasted to Mingw32 which links
dynamically to msvcrt.dll or crtdll.dll.
+ Cygwin implements a Posix/Unix runtime system (cygwin1.dll) on top of
Win32 subsystem and provides a bash shell and GNU tools environment.
+ Consequently, a make of OpenSSL with Cygwin is virtually identical to
+ Unix procedure. It is also possible to create Win32 binaries that only
+ use the Microsoft C runtime system (msvcrt.dll or crtdll.dll) using
+ MinGW. MinGW can be used in the Cygwin development environment or in a
standalone setup as described in the following section.
 
  To build OpenSSL using Cygwin:
 
  * Install Cygwin (see http://cygwin.com/)
 
- * Install Perl and ensure it is in the path (recent Cygwin perl 
-   (version 5.6.1-2 of the latter has been reported to work) or
-   ActivePerl)
+ * Install Perl and ensure it is in the path. Both Cygwin perl
+   (5.6.1-2 or newer) and ActivePerl work.
 
  * Run the Cygwin bash shell
 
  * $ tar zxvf openssl-x.x.x.tar.gz
    $ cd openssl-x.x.x
+
+   To build the Cygwin version of OpenSSL:
+
    $ ./config
    [...]
    $ make
    $ make test
    $ make install
 
- This will create a default install in /usr/local/ssl.
+   This will create a default install in /usr/local/ssl.
+
+   To build the MinGW version (native Windows) in Cygwin:
+
+   $ ./Configure mingw
+   [...]
+   $ make
+   [...]
+   $ make test
+   $ make install
 
  Cygwin Notes:
 
  non-fatal error in "make test" but is otherwise harmless.  If
  desired and needed, GNU bc can be built with Cygwin without change.
 
+ GNU C (MinGW/MSYS)
+ -------------
+
+ * Compiler and shell environment installation:
+
+   MinGW and MSYS are available from http://www.mingw.org/, both are
+   required. Run the installers and do whatever magic they say it takes
+   to start MSYS bash shell with GNU tools on its PATH.
+
+ * Compile OpenSSL:
+
+   $ ./config
+   [...]
+   $ make
+   [...]
+   $ make test
+
+   This will create the library and binaries in root source directory
+   and openssl.exe application in apps directory.
+
+   It is also possible to cross-compile it on Linux by configuring
+   with './Configure --cross-compile-prefix=i386-mingw32- mingw ...'.
+   'make test' is naturally not applicable then.
+
+   libcrypto.a and libssl.a are the static libraries. To use the DLLs,
+   link with libeay32.a and libssl32.a instead.
+
+   See troubleshooting if you get error messages about functions not
+   having a number assigned.
 
  Installation
  ------------
        $ md c:\openssl\lib
        $ md c:\openssl\include
        $ md c:\openssl\include\openssl
-       $ copy /b inc32\*               c:\openssl\include\openssl
+       $ copy /b inc32\openssl\*       c:\openssl\include\openssl
        $ copy /b out32dll\ssleay32.lib c:\openssl\lib
        $ copy /b out32dll\libeay32.lib c:\openssl\lib
        $ copy /b out32dll\ssleay32.dll c:\openssl\bin
  (e.g. fopen()), and OpenSSL cannot change these; so in general you cannot
  rely on CRYPTO_malloc_init() solving your problem, and you should
  consistently use the multithreaded library.
+
+ Linking your application
+ ------------------------
+
+ If you link with static OpenSSL libraries [those built with ms/nt.mak],
+ then you're expected to additionally link your application with
+ WS2_32.LIB, ADVAPI32.LIB, GDI32.LIB and USER32.LIB. Those developing
+ non-interactive service applications might feel concerned about linking
+ with the latter two, as they are justly associated with interactive
+ desktop, which is not available to service processes. The toolkit is
+ designed to detect in which context it's currently executed, GUI,
+ console app or service, and act accordingly, namely whether or not to
+ actually make GUI calls.
+
+ If you link with OpenSSL .DLLs, then you're expected to include into
+ your application code small "shim" snippet, which provides glue between
+ OpenSSL BIO layer and your compiler run-time. Look up OPENSSL_Applink
+ reference page for further details.