Provide documentation for i2d_ECPrivateKey and d2i_ECPrivateKey
[openssl.git] / doc / crypto / des_modes.pod
1 =pod
2
3 =for comment openssl_manual_section:7
4
5 =head1 NAME
6
7 des_modes - the variants of DES and other crypto algorithms of OpenSSL
8
9 =head1 DESCRIPTION
10
11 Several crypto algorithms for OpenSSL can be used in a number of modes.  Those
12 are used for using block ciphers in a way similar to stream ciphers, among
13 other things.
14
15 =head1 OVERVIEW
16
17 =head2 Electronic Codebook Mode (ECB)
18
19 Normally, this is found as the function I<algorithm>_ecb_encrypt().
20
21 =over 2
22
23 =item *
24
25 64 bits are enciphered at a time.
26
27 =item *
28
29 The order of the blocks can be rearranged without detection.
30
31 =item *
32
33 The same plaintext block always produces the same ciphertext block
34 (for the same key) making it vulnerable to a 'dictionary attack'.
35
36 =item *
37
38 An error will only affect one ciphertext block.
39
40 =back
41
42 =head2 Cipher Block Chaining Mode (CBC)
43
44 Normally, this is found as the function I<algorithm>_cbc_encrypt().
45 Be aware that des_cbc_encrypt() is not really DES CBC (it does
46 not update the IV); use des_ncbc_encrypt() instead.
47
48 =over 2
49
50 =item *
51
52 a multiple of 64 bits are enciphered at a time.
53
54 =item *
55
56 The CBC mode produces the same ciphertext whenever the same
57 plaintext is encrypted using the same key and starting variable.
58
59 =item *
60
61 The chaining operation makes the ciphertext blocks dependent on the
62 current and all preceding plaintext blocks and therefore blocks can not
63 be rearranged.
64
65 =item *
66
67 The use of different starting variables prevents the same plaintext
68 enciphering to the same ciphertext.
69
70 =item *
71
72 An error will affect the current and the following ciphertext blocks.
73
74 =back
75
76 =head2 Cipher Feedback Mode (CFB)
77
78 Normally, this is found as the function I<algorithm>_cfb_encrypt().
79
80 =over 2
81
82 =item *
83
84 a number of bits (j) <= 64 are enciphered at a time.
85
86 =item *
87
88 The CFB mode produces the same ciphertext whenever the same
89 plaintext is encrypted using the same key and starting variable.
90
91 =item *
92
93 The chaining operation makes the ciphertext variables dependent on the
94 current and all preceding variables and therefore j-bit variables are
95 chained together and can not be rearranged.
96
97 =item *
98
99 The use of different starting variables prevents the same plaintext
100 enciphering to the same ciphertext.
101
102 =item *
103
104 The strength of the CFB mode depends on the size of k (maximal if
105 j == k).  In my implementation this is always the case.
106
107 =item *
108
109 Selection of a small value for j will require more cycles through
110 the encipherment algorithm per unit of plaintext and thus cause
111 greater processing overheads.
112
113 =item *
114
115 Only multiples of j bits can be enciphered.
116
117 =item *
118
119 An error will affect the current and the following ciphertext variables.
120
121 =back
122
123 =head2 Output Feedback Mode (OFB)
124
125 Normally, this is found as the function I<algorithm>_ofb_encrypt().
126
127 =over 2
128
129
130 =item *
131
132 a number of bits (j) <= 64 are enciphered at a time.
133
134 =item *
135
136 The OFB mode produces the same ciphertext whenever the same
137 plaintext enciphered using the same key and starting variable.  More
138 over, in the OFB mode the same key stream is produced when the same
139 key and start variable are used.  Consequently, for security reasons
140 a specific start variable should be used only once for a given key.
141
142 =item *
143
144 The absence of chaining makes the OFB more vulnerable to specific attacks.
145
146 =item *
147
148 The use of different start variables values prevents the same
149 plaintext enciphering to the same ciphertext, by producing different
150 key streams.
151
152 =item *
153
154 Selection of a small value for j will require more cycles through
155 the encipherment algorithm per unit of plaintext and thus cause
156 greater processing overheads.
157
158 =item *
159
160 Only multiples of j bits can be enciphered.
161
162 =item *
163
164 OFB mode of operation does not extend ciphertext errors in the
165 resultant plaintext output.  Every bit error in the ciphertext causes
166 only one bit to be in error in the deciphered plaintext.
167
168 =item *
169
170 OFB mode is not self-synchronizing.  If the two operation of
171 encipherment and decipherment get out of synchronism, the system needs
172 to be re-initialized.
173
174 =item *
175
176 Each re-initialization should use a value of the start variable
177 different from the start variable values used before with the same
178 key.  The reason for this is that an identical bit stream would be
179 produced each time from the same parameters.  This would be
180 susceptible to a 'known plaintext' attack.
181
182 =back
183
184 =head2 Triple ECB Mode
185
186 Normally, this is found as the function I<algorithm>_ecb3_encrypt().
187
188 =over 2
189
190 =item *
191
192 Encrypt with key1, decrypt with key2 and encrypt with key3 again.
193
194 =item *
195
196 As for ECB encryption but increases the key length to 168 bits.
197 There are theoretic attacks that can be used that make the effective
198 key length 112 bits, but this attack also requires 2^56 blocks of
199 memory, not very likely, even for the NSA.
200
201 =item *
202
203 If both keys are the same it is equivalent to encrypting once with
204 just one key.
205
206 =item *
207
208 If the first and last key are the same, the key length is 112 bits.
209 There are attacks that could reduce the effective key strength
210 to only slightly more than 56 bits, but these require a lot of memory.
211
212 =item *
213
214 If all 3 keys are the same, this is effectively the same as normal
215 ecb mode.
216
217 =back
218
219 =head2 Triple CBC Mode
220
221 Normally, this is found as the function I<algorithm>_ede3_cbc_encrypt().
222
223 =over 2
224
225
226 =item *
227
228 Encrypt with key1, decrypt with key2 and then encrypt with key3.
229
230 =item *
231
232 As for CBC encryption but increases the key length to 168 bits with
233 the same restrictions as for triple ecb mode.
234
235 =back
236
237 =head1 NOTES
238
239 This text was been written in large parts by Eric Young in his original
240 documentation for SSLeay, the predecessor of OpenSSL.  In turn, he attributed
241 it to:
242
243         AS 2805.5.2
244         Australian Standard
245         Electronic funds transfer - Requirements for interfaces,
246         Part 5.2: Modes of operation for an n-bit block cipher algorithm
247         Appendix A
248
249 =head1 SEE ALSO
250
251 L<blowfish(3)|blowfish(3)>, L<des(3)|des(3)>, L<idea(3)|idea(3)>,
252 L<rc2(3)|rc2(3)>
253
254 =cut
255