cc102a9689a2e92caafdf3ab47a8c9c9f534c7e9
[openssl.git] / doc / apps / config.pod
1
2 =pod
3
4 =head1 NAME
5
6 config - OpenSSL CONF library configuration files
7
8 =head1 DESCRIPTION
9
10 The OpenSSL CONF library can be used to read configuration files.
11 It is used for the OpenSSL master configuration file B<openssl.cnf>
12 and in a few other places like B<SPKAC> files and certificate extension
13 files for the B<x509> utility. OpenSSL applications can also use the
14 CONF library for their own purposes.
15
16 A configuration file is divided into a number of sections. Each section
17 starts with a line B<[ section_name ]> and ends when a new section is
18 started or end of file is reached. A section name can consist of
19 alphanumeric characters and underscores.
20
21 The first section of a configuration file is special and is referred
22 to as the B<default> section this is usually unnamed and is from the
23 start of file until the first named section. When a name is being looked up
24 it is first looked up in a named section (if any) and then the
25 default section.
26
27 The environment is mapped onto a section called B<ENV>.
28
29 Comments can be included by preceding them with the B<#> character
30
31 Each section in a configuration file consists of a number of name and
32 value pairs of the form B<name=value>
33
34 The B<name> string can contain any alphanumeric characters as well as
35 a few punctuation symbols such as B<.> B<,> B<;> and B<_>.
36
37 The B<value> string consists of the string following the B<=> character
38 until end of line with any leading and trailing white space removed.
39
40 The value string undergoes variable expansion. This can be done by
41 including the form B<$var> or B<${var}>: this will substitute the value
42 of the named variable in the current section. It is also possible to
43 substitute a value from another section using the syntax B<$section::name>
44 or B<${section::name}>. By using the form B<$ENV::name> environment
45 variables can be substituted. It is also possible to assign values to
46 environment variables by using the name B<ENV::name>, this will work
47 if the program looks up environment variables using the B<CONF> library
48 instead of calling B<getenv()> directly.
49
50 It is possible to escape certain characters by using any kind of quote
51 or the B<\> character. By making the last character of a line a B<\>
52 a B<value> string can be spread across multiple lines. In addition
53 the sequences B<\n>, B<\r>, B<\b> and B<\t> are recognized.
54
55 =head1 OPENSSL LIBRARY CONFIGURATION
56
57 In OpenSSL 0.9.7 and later applications can automatically configure certain
58 aspects of OpenSSL using the master OpenSSL configuration file, or optionally
59 an alternative configuration file. The B<openssl> utility includes this
60 functionality: any sub command uses the master OpenSSL configuration file
61 unless an option is used in the sub command to use an alternative configuration
62 file.
63
64 To enable library configuration the default section needs to contain an 
65 appropriate line which points to the main configuration section. The default
66 name is B<openssl_conf> which is used by the B<openssl> utility. Other
67 applications may use an alternative name such as B<myapplicaton_conf>.
68
69 The configuration section should consist of a set of name value pairs which
70 contain specific module configuration information. The B<name> represents
71 the name of the I<configuration module> the meaning of the B<value> is 
72 module specific: it may, for example, represent a further configuration
73 section containing configuration module specific information. E.g.
74
75  openssl_conf = openssl_init
76
77  [openssl_init]
78
79  oid_section = new_oids
80  engines = engine_section
81
82  [new_oids]
83
84  ... new oids here ...
85
86  [engine_section]
87
88  ... engine stuff here ...
89
90 Currently there are two supported configuration modules supported. One for
91 ASN1 objects another for ENGINE configuration.
92
93 =head2 ASN1 OBJECT CONFIGURATION MODULE
94
95 This module has the name B<oid_section>. The value of this variable points
96 to a section containing name value pairs of OIDs: the name is the OID short
97 and long name, the value is the numerical form of the OID. Although some of
98 the B<openssl> utility sub commands already have their own ASN1 OBJECT section
99 functionality not all do. By using the ASN1 OBJECT configuration module
100 B<all> the B<openssl> utility sub commands can see the new objects as well
101 as any compliant applications. For example:
102
103  [new_oids]
104  
105  some_new_oid = 1.2.3.4
106  some_other_oid = 1.2.3.5
107
108 =head2 ENGINE CONFIGURATION MODULE
109
110 To be continued...
111
112 =head1 NOTES
113
114 If a configuration file attempts to expand a variable that doesn't exist
115 then an error is flagged and the file will not load. This can happen
116 if an attempt is made to expand an environment variable that doesn't
117 exist. For example in a previous version of OpenSSL the default OpenSSL
118 master configuration file used the value of B<HOME> which may not be
119 defined on non Unix systems and would cause an error.
120
121 This can be worked around by including a B<default> section to provide
122 a default value: then if the environment lookup fails the default value
123 will be used instead. For this to work properly the default value must
124 be defined earlier in the configuration file than the expansion. See
125 the B<EXAMPLES> section for an example of how to do this.
126
127 If the same variable exists in the same section then all but the last
128 value will be silently ignored. In certain circumstances such as with
129 DNs the same field may occur multiple times. This is usually worked
130 around by ignoring any characters before an initial B<.> e.g.
131
132  1.OU="My first OU"
133  2.OU="My Second OU"
134
135 =head1 EXAMPLES
136
137 Here is a sample configuration file using some of the features
138 mentioned above.
139
140  # This is the default section.
141  
142  HOME=/temp
143  RANDFILE= ${ENV::HOME}/.rnd
144  configdir=$ENV::HOME/config
145
146  [ section_one ]
147
148  # We are now in section one.
149
150  # Quotes permit leading and trailing whitespace
151  any = " any variable name "
152
153  other = A string that can \
154  cover several lines \
155  by including \\ characters
156
157  message = Hello World\n
158
159  [ section_two ]
160
161  greeting = $section_one::message
162
163 This next example shows how to expand environment variables safely.
164
165 Suppose you want a variable called B<tmpfile> to refer to a
166 temporary filename. The directory it is placed in can determined by
167 the the B<TEMP> or B<TMP> environment variables but they may not be
168 set to any value at all. If you just include the environment variable
169 names and the variable doesn't exist then this will cause an error when
170 an attempt is made to load the configuration file. By making use of the
171 default section both values can be looked up with B<TEMP> taking 
172 priority and B</tmp> used if neither is defined:
173
174  TMP=/tmp
175  # The above value is used if TMP isn't in the environment
176  TEMP=$ENV::TMP
177  # The above value is used if TEMP isn't in the environment
178  tmpfile=${ENV::TEMP}/tmp.filename
179
180 =head1 BUGS
181
182 Currently there is no way to include characters using the octal B<\nnn>
183 form. Strings are all null terminated so nulls cannot form part of
184 the value.
185
186 The escaping isn't quite right: if you want to use sequences like B<\n>
187 you can't use any quote escaping on the same line.
188
189 Files are loaded in a single pass. This means that an variable expansion
190 will only work if the variables referenced are defined earlier in the
191 file.
192
193 =head1 SEE ALSO
194
195 L<x509(1)|x509(1)>, L<req(1)|req(1)>, L<ca(1)|ca(1)>
196
197 =cut