Fix many MarkDown issues in {NOTES*,README*,HACKING,LICENSE}.md files
[openssl.git] / crypto / README-sparse_array.md
1 Sparse Arrays
2 =============
3
4 The `sparse_array.c` file contains an implementation of a sparse array that
5 attempts to be both space and time efficient.
6
7 The sparse array is represented using a tree structure.  Each node in the
8 tree contains a block of pointers to either the user supplied leaf values or
9 to another node.
10
11 There are a number of parameters used to define the block size:
12
13     OPENSSL_SA_BLOCK_BITS   Specifies the number of bits covered by each block
14     SA_BLOCK_MAX            Specifies the number of pointers in each block
15     SA_BLOCK_MASK           Specifies a bit mask to perform modulo block size
16     SA_BLOCK_MAX_LEVELS     Indicates the maximum possible height of the tree
17
18 These constants are inter-related:
19
20     SA_BLOCK_MAX        = 2 ^ OPENSSL_SA_BLOCK_BITS
21     SA_BLOCK_MASK       = SA_BLOCK_MAX - 1
22     SA_BLOCK_MAX_LEVELS = number of bits in size_t divided by
23                           OPENSSL_SA_BLOCK_BITS rounded up to the next multiple
24                           of OPENSSL_SA_BLOCK_BITS
25
26 `OPENSSL_SA_BLOCK_BITS` can be defined at compile time and this overrides the
27 built in setting.
28
29 As a space and performance optimisation, the height of the tree is usually
30 less than the maximum possible height.  Only sufficient height is allocated to
31 accommodate the largest index added to the data structure.
32
33 The largest index used to add a value to the array determines the tree height:
34
35         +----------------------+---------------------+
36         | Largest Added Index  |   Height of Tree    |
37         +----------------------+---------------------+
38         | SA_BLOCK_MAX     - 1 |          1          |
39         | SA_BLOCK_MAX ^ 2 - 1 |          2          |
40         | SA_BLOCK_MAX ^ 3 - 1 |          3          |
41         | ...                  |          ...        |
42         | size_t max           | SA_BLOCK_MAX_LEVELS |
43         +----------------------+---------------------+
44
45 The tree height is dynamically increased as needed based on additions.
46
47 An empty tree is represented by a NULL root pointer.  Inserting a value at
48 index 0 results in the allocation of a top level node full of null pointers
49 except for the single pointer to the user's data (N = SA_BLOCK_MAX for
50 brevity):
51
52         +----+
53         |Root|
54         |Node|
55         +-+--+
56           |
57           |
58           |
59           v
60         +-+-+---+---+---+---+
61         | 0 | 1 | 2 |...|N-1|
62         |   |nil|nil|...|nil|
63         +-+-+---+---+---+---+
64           |
65           |
66           |
67           v
68         +-+--+
69         |User|
70         |Data|
71         +----+
72     Index 0
73
74 Inserting at element 2N+1 creates a new root node and pushes down the old root
75 node.  It then creates a second second level node to hold the pointer to the
76 user's new data:
77
78         +----+
79         |Root|
80         |Node|
81         +-+--+
82           |
83           |
84           |
85           v
86         +-+-+---+---+---+---+
87         | 0 | 1 | 2 |...|N-1|
88         |   |nil|   |...|nil|
89         +-+-+---+-+-+---+---+
90           |       |
91           |       +------------------+
92           |                          |
93           v                          v
94         +-+-+---+---+---+---+      +-+-+---+---+---+---+
95         | 0 | 1 | 2 |...|N-1|      | 0 | 1 | 2 |...|N-1|
96         |nil|   |nil|...|nil|      |nil|   |nil|...|nil|
97         +-+-+---+---+---+---+      +---+-+-+---+---+---+
98           |                              |
99           |                              |
100           |                              |
101           v                              v
102         +-+--+                         +-+--+
103         |User|                         |User|
104         |Data|                         |Data|
105         +----+                         +----+
106     Index 0                       Index 2N+1
107
108 The nodes themselves are allocated in a sparse manner.  Only nodes which exist
109 along a path from the root of the tree to an added leaf will be allocated.
110 The complexity is hidden and nodes are allocated on an as needed basis.
111 Because the data is expected to be sparse this doesn't result in a large waste
112 of space.
113
114 Values can be removed from the sparse array by setting their index position to
115 NULL.  The data structure does not attempt to reclaim nodes or reduce the
116 height of the tree on removal.  For example, now setting index 0 to NULL would
117 result in:
118
119         +----+
120         |Root|
121         |Node|
122         +-+--+
123           |
124           |
125           |
126           v
127         +-+-+---+---+---+---+
128         | 0 | 1 | 2 |...|N-1|
129         |   |nil|   |...|nil|
130         +-+-+---+-+-+---+---+
131           |       |
132           |       +------------------+
133           |                          |
134           v                          v
135         +-+-+---+---+---+---+      +-+-+---+---+---+---+
136         | 0 | 1 | 2 |...|N-1|      | 0 | 1 | 2 |...|N-1|
137         |nil|nil|nil|...|nil|      |nil|   |nil|...|nil|
138         +---+---+---+---+---+      +---+-+-+---+---+---+
139                                          |
140                                          |
141                                          |
142                                          v
143                                        +-+--+
144                                        |User|
145                                        |Data|
146                                        +----+
147                                   Index 2N+1
148
149 Accesses to elements in the sparse array take O(log n) time where n is the
150 largest element.  The base of the logarithm is `SA_BLOCK_MAX`, so for moderately
151 small indices (e.g. NIDs), single level (constant time) access is achievable.
152 Space usage is O(minimum(m, n log(n)) where m is the number of elements in the
153 array.
154
155 Note: sparse arrays only include pointers to types.
156 Thus, `SPARSE_ARRAY_OF(char)` can be used to store a string.