remove
[openssl.git] / INSTALL.W32
1  
2  INSTALLATION ON THE WIN32 PLATFORM
3  ----------------------------------
4
5  Heres a few comments about building OpenSSL in Windows environments. Most of
6  this is tested on Win32 but it may also work in Win 3.1 with some
7  modification.
8
9  You need Perl for Win32 (available from http://www.activestate.com/ActivePerl)
10  and one of the following C compilers:
11
12   * Visual C++
13   * Borland C
14   * GNU C (Mingw32 or Cygwin32)
15
16  If you want to compile in the assembly language routines with Visual C++ then
17  you will need an assembler. This is worth doing because it will result in
18  faster code: for example it will typically result in a 2 times speedup in the
19  RSA routines. Currently the following assemblers are supported:
20
21   * Microsoft MASM (aka "ml")
22   * Free Netwide Assembler NASM.
23
24  MASM was I believe distributed in the past with VC++ and it is also part of
25  the MSDN SDKs. It is no longer distributed as part of VC++ and can be hard
26  to get hold of. It can be purchased: see Microsoft's site for details at:
27  http://www.microsoft.com/
28
29  NASM is freely available. Version 0.98 was used during testing: other versions
30  may also work. It is available from many places, see for example:
31  http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/devel/nasm/binaries/win32/
32  The NASM binary nasmw.exe needs to be installed anywhere on your PATH.
33
34  If you are compiling from a tarball or a CVS snapshot then the Win32 files
35  may well be not up to date. This may mean that some "tweaking" is required to
36  get it all to work. See the trouble shooting section later on for if (when?)
37  it goes wrong.
38
39  Visual C++
40  ----------
41
42  Firstly you should run Configure:
43
44  > perl Configure VC-WIN32
45
46  Next you need to build the Makefiles and optionally the assembly language
47  files:
48
49  - If you are using MASM then run:
50
51    > ms\do_masm
52
53  - If you are using NASM then run:
54
55    > ms\do_nasm
56
57  - If you don't want to use the assembly language files at all then run:
58
59    > ms\do_ms
60
61  If you get errors about things not having numbers assigned then check the
62  troubleshooting section: you probably wont be able to compile it as it
63  stands.
64
65  Then from the VC++ environment at a prompt do:
66
67  > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
68
69  If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and executables
70  in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
71  
72  > cd out32dll
73  > ..\ms\test
74
75  Tweaks:
76
77  There are various changes you can make to the Win32 compile environment. By
78  default the library is not compiled with debugging symbols. If you add 'debug'
79  to the mk1mk.pl lines in the do_* batch file then debugging symbols will be
80  compiled in.
81
82  The default Win32 environment is to leave out any Windows NT specific
83  features.
84
85  If you want to enable the NT specific features of OpenSSL (currently only the
86  logging BIO) follow the instructions above but call the batch file do_nt.bat
87  instead of do_ms.bat.
88
89  You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile
90  ms\nt.mak
91
92  Borland C++ builder 3 and 4
93  ---------------------------
94
95  * Setup PATH. First must be GNU make then bcb4/bin 
96
97  * Run ms\bcb4.bat
98
99  * Run make:
100    > make -f bcb.mak
101
102  GNU C (Mingw32)
103  ---------------
104
105  To build OpenSSL, you need the Mingw32 package and GNU make.
106
107  * Compiler installation:
108
109    Mingw32 is available from <ftp://ftp.xraylith.wisc.edu/pub/khan/gnu-win32/
110    mingw32/egcs-1.1.2/egcs-1.1.2-mingw32.zip>. GNU make is at
111    <ftp://agnes.dida.physik.uni-essen.de/home/janjaap/mingw32/binaries/
112    make-3.76.1.zip>. Install both of them in C:\egcs-1.1.2 and run
113    C:\egcs-1.1.2\mingw32.bat to set the PATH.
114
115  * Compile OpenSSL:
116
117    > perl Configure Mingw32
118    > ms\mw.bat
119
120    This will create the library and binaries in out.
121
122    libcrypto.a and libssl.a are the static libraries. To use the DLLs,
123    link with libeay32.a and libssl32.a instead.
124
125    See troubleshooting if you get error messages about functions not having
126    a number assigned.
127
128  * You can now try the tests:
129
130    > cd out
131    > ..\ms\test
132
133  Troubleshooting
134  ---------------
135
136  Since the Win32 build is only occasionally tested it may not always compile
137  cleanly.  If you get an error about functions not having numbers assigned
138  when you run ms\do_ms then this means the Win32 ordinal files are not up to
139  date. You can do:
140
141  > perl util\mkdef.pl crypto ssl update
142
143  then ms\do_XXX should not give a warning any more. However the numbers that
144  get assigned by this technique may not match those that eventually get
145  assigned in the CVS tree: so anything linked against this version of the
146  library may need to be recompiled.
147
148  If you get errors about unresolved externals then this means that either you
149  didn't read the note above about functions not having numbers assigned or
150  someone forgot to add a function to the header file.
151
152  In this latter case check out the header file to see if the function is
153  defined in the header file.
154
155  If you get warnings in the code then the compilation will halt.
156
157  The default Makefile for Win32 halts whenever any warnings occur. Since VC++
158  has its own ideas about warnings which don't always match up to other
159  environments this can happen. The best fix is to edit the file with the
160  warning in and fix it. Alternatively you can turn off the halt on warnings by
161  editing the CFLAG line in the Makefile and deleting the /WX option.
162
163  You might get compilation errors. Again you will have to fix these or report
164  them.
165
166  One final comment about compiling applications linked to the OpenSSL library.
167  If you don't use the multithreaded DLL runtime library (/MD option) your
168  program will almost certainly crash because malloc gets confused -- the
169  OpenSSL DLLs are statically linked to one version, the application must
170  not use a different one.  You might be able to work around such problems
171  by adding CRYPTO_malloc_init() to your program before any calls to the
172  OpenSSL libraries: This tells the OpenSSL libraries to use the same
173  malloc(), free() and realloc() as the application.  However there are many
174  standard library functions used by OpenSSL that call malloc() internally
175  (e.g. fopen()), and OpenSSL cannot change these; so in general you cannot
176  rely on CYRPTO_malloc_init() solving your problem, and you should
177  consistently use the multithreaded library.