Final API adaptation. Final, "all openssl" performance numbers [not mixture
authorAndy Polyakov <appro@openssl.org>
Thu, 20 May 2004 21:18:09 +0000 (21:18 +0000)
committerAndy Polyakov <appro@openssl.org>
Thu, 20 May 2004 21:18:09 +0000 (21:18 +0000)
of different implementations]. Real-life performance improvement is rated
at 2-3x, not 6x as preliminary announced.

crypto/sha/asm/sha512-sse2.pl

index 87a14ae..4235dba 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,11 @@
 #!/usr/bin/env perl
 #
+# ====================================================================
+# Written by Andy Polyakov <appro@fy.chalmers.se> for the OpenSSL
+# project. Rights for redistribution and usage in source and binary
+# forms are granted according to the OpenSSL license.
+# ====================================================================
+#
 # SHA512_Transform_SSE2.
 #
 # As the name suggests, this is an IA-32 SSE2 implementation of
 # a 64-bit instruction set? Is it rich enough to implement SHA512?
 # If answer was "no," then you wouldn't have been reading this...
 #
-# [Preliminary] throughput numbers (larger is better):
-#
-#              2.4GHz P4       1.4GHz AMD32    1.4GHz AMD64
-# SHA256/gcc   38              36              46
-# SHA512/gcc   9               15              72
-# SHA512/sse2  53(*)           51
-# SHA512/icc   21              21
-# SHA256/icc   52              42
+# Throughput performance in MBps (larger is better):
 #
-#  (*) I.e. it gives ~6x speed-up on P4 if compared to code generated
-#      by gcc, and 2.5x over icc. It was worth it:-) Well, one can
-#      argue that handcoded *non*-SSE2 implementation would perform
-#      better than compiler generated one, and comparison therefore
-#      is not exactly fair. As SHA512 puts enormous pressure on IA-32
-#      GP register bank, I reckon handcoded version wouldn't perform
-#      significantly better than one compiled with icc, ~20% perhaps.
-#      So that this code would still outperform it with distinguishing
-#      marginal. But feel free to prove me wrong:-)
+#              2.4GHz P4       1.4GHz AMD32    1.4GHz AMD64(*)
+# SHA256/gcc(*)        39              42              59
+# SHA512/gcc   17              23              92
+# SHA512/sse2  54(**)          55(**)
+# SHA512/icc   26              28
+# SHA256/icc(*)        64              54
 #
+# (*)  AMD64 and SHA256 numbers are presented mostly for amusement or
+#      reference purposes.
+# (**) I.e. it gives ~2-3x speed-up if compared with compiler generated
+#      code. One can argue that hand-coded *non*-SSE2 implementation
+#      would perform better than compiler generated one as well, and
+#      that comparison is therefore not exactly fair. Well, as SHA512
+#      puts enormous pressure on IA-32 GP register bank, I reckon that
+#      hand-coded version wouldn't perform significantly better than
+#      one compiled with icc, ~20% perhaps... So that this code would
+#      still outperform it with distinguishing marginal. But feel free
+#      to prove me wrong:-)
 #                                              <appro@fy.chalmers.se>
 push(@INC,"perlasm","../../perlasm");
 require "x86asm.pl";
@@ -67,7 +74,9 @@ sub SHA2_ROUND()
 
        # I adhere to 64-bit %mmX registers in order to avoid/not care
        # about #GP exceptions on misaligned 128-bit access, most
-       # notably in paddq with memory operand.
+       # notably in paddq with memory operand. Not to mention that
+       # SSE2 intructions operating on %mmX can be scheduled every
+       # cycle [and not every second one if operating on %xmmN].
 
        &movq   ("mm4",&QWP($Foff,$W512));      # load f
        &movq   ("mm5",&QWP($Goff,$W512));      # load g
@@ -135,7 +144,7 @@ sub SHA2_ROUND()
        &paddq  ($A,"mm6");                     # a+=T2
 }
 
-$func="SHA512_Transform_SSE2";
+$func="sha512_block_sse2";
 
 &function_begin_B($func);
        if (0) {# Caller is expected to check if it's appropriate to
@@ -169,6 +178,10 @@ $func="SHA512_Transform_SSE2";
        &movdqu ("xmm1",&QWP(16,$Widx));
        &movdqu ("xmm2",&QWP(32,$Widx));
        &movdqu ("xmm3",&QWP(48,$Widx));
+
+&align(8);
+&set_label("_chunk_loop");
+
        &movdqa (&QWP($Aoff,$W512),"xmm0");     # a,b
        &movdqa (&QWP($Coff,$W512),"xmm1");     # c,d
        &movdqa (&QWP($Eoff,$W512),"xmm2");     # e,f
@@ -181,8 +194,12 @@ $func="SHA512_Transform_SSE2";
 
        # Why aren't loops unrolled? It makes sense to unroll if
        # execution time for loop body is comparable with branch
-       # penalties and/or if whole data-set resides in register
-       # bank. Neither is case here...
+       # penalties and/or if whole data-set resides in register bank.
+       # Neither is case here... Well, it would be possible to
+       # eliminate few store operations, but it would hardly affect
+       # so to say stop-watch performance, as there is a lot of
+       # available memory slots to fill. It will only relieve some
+       # pressure off memory bus...
 
 &align(8);
 &set_label("_1st_loop");               # 0-15
@@ -274,6 +291,10 @@ $func="SHA512_Transform_SSE2";
        &movdqu (&QWP(32,$Widx),"xmm2");
        &movdqu (&QWP(48,$Widx),"xmm3");
 
+&add   ($data,16*8);                           # advance input data pointer
+&dec   (&DWP(16,"ebp"));                       # decrement 3rd arg
+&jnz   (&label("_chunk_loop"));
+
        # epilogue
        &emms   ();     # required for at least ELF and Win32 ABIs
        &mov    ("edi",&DWP(-12,"ebp"));