Various doc fixes from GH pull requests
authorRich Salz <rsalz@akamai.com>
Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:52:57 +0000 (11:52 -0400)
committerRich Salz <rsalz@openssl.org>
Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:27:27 +0000 (12:27 -0400)
Thanks folks:
        348 Benjamin Kaduk
        317 Christian Brueffer
        254 Erik Tews
        253 Erik Tews
        219 Carl Mehner
        155 (ghost)
        95 mancha
        51 DominikNeubauer

Reviewed-by: Dr. Stephen Henson <steve@openssl.org>
CHANGES
README
apps/s_client.c
doc/HOWTO/keys.txt
doc/apps/pkcs12.pod
doc/apps/req.pod
doc/crypto/EVP_EncryptInit.pod
doc/crypto/EVP_SealInit.pod
doc/crypto/engine.pod

diff --git a/CHANGES b/CHANGES
index c5be241..cd75e0b 100644 (file)
--- a/CHANGES
+++ b/CHANGES
      [mancha <mancha1@zoho.com>]
 
   *) Fix eckey_priv_encode so it immediately returns an error upon a failure
-     in i2d_ECPrivateKey.
+     in i2d_ECPrivateKey.  Thanks to Ted Unangst for feedback on this issue.
      [mancha <mancha1@zoho.com>]
 
   *) Fix some double frees. These are not thought to be exploitable.
diff --git a/README b/README
index 40c2e83..13464f2 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 
  OpenSSL 1.1.0-dev
 
- Copyright (c) 1998-2011 The OpenSSL Project
+ Copyright (c) 1998-2015 The OpenSSL Project
  Copyright (c) 1995-1998 Eric A. Young, Tim J. Hudson
  All rights reserved.
 
index a5fddca..f4132c8 100644 (file)
@@ -588,7 +588,7 @@ OPTIONS s_client_options[] = {
      "SRP username into second ClientHello message"},
     {"srp_moregroups", OPT_SRP_MOREGROUPS, '-',
      "Tolerate other than the known g N values."},
-    {"srp_strength", OPT_SRP_STRENGTH, 'p', "Minimal mength in bits for N"},
+    {"srp_strength", OPT_SRP_STRENGTH, 'p', "Minimal length in bits for N"},
 #endif
 #ifndef OPENSSL_NO_NEXTPROTONEG
     {"nextprotoneg", OPT_NEXTPROTONEG, 's',
index 7ae2a3a..ba0314f 100644 (file)
@@ -40,9 +40,8 @@ consider insecure or to be insecure pretty soon.
 
 3. To generate a DSA key
 
-A DSA key can be used for signing only.  This is important to keep
-in mind to know what kind of purposes a certificate request with a
-DSA key can really be used for.
+A DSA key can be used for signing only.  It is important to
+know what a certificate request with a DSA key can really be used for.
 
 Generating a key for the DSA algorithm is a two-step process.  First,
 you have to generate parameters from which to generate the key:
index 8e0d917..7449848 100644 (file)
@@ -216,7 +216,7 @@ key is encrypted using triple DES and the certificate using 40 bit RC2.
 
 these options allow the algorithm used to encrypt the private key and
 certificates to be selected. Any PKCS#5 v1.5 or PKCS#12 PBE algorithm name
-can be used (see B<NOTES> section for more information). If a cipher name
+can be used (see B<NOTES> section for more information). If a cipher name
 (as output by the B<list-cipher-algorithms> command is specified then it
 is used with PKCS#5 v2.0. For interoperability reasons it is advisable to only
 use PKCS#12 algorithms.
index 9e8e1ab..2ce2bca 100644 (file)
@@ -30,7 +30,6 @@ B<openssl> B<req>
 [B<-keygen_engine id>]
 [B<-[digest]>]
 [B<-config filename>]
-[B<-subj arg>]
 [B<-multivalue-rdn>]
 [B<-x509>]
 [B<-days n>]
@@ -506,16 +505,16 @@ Examine and verify certificate request:
 
 Create a private key and then generate a certificate request from it:
 
- openssl genrsa -out key.pem 1024
+ openssl genrsa -out key.pem 2048
  openssl req -new -key key.pem -out req.pem
 
 The same but just using req:
 
- openssl req -newkey rsa:1024 -keyout key.pem -out req.pem
+ openssl req -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout key.pem -out req.pem
 
 Generate a self signed root certificate:
 
- openssl req -x509 -newkey rsa:1024 -keyout key.pem -out req.pem
+ openssl req -x509 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout key.pem -out req.pem
 
 Example of a file pointed to by the B<oid_file> option:
 
@@ -531,7 +530,7 @@ expansion:
 Sample configuration file prompting for field values:
 
  [ req ]
- default_bits          = 1024
+ default_bits          = 2048
  default_keyfile       = privkey.pem
  distinguished_name    = req_distinguished_name
  attributes            = req_attributes
@@ -572,7 +571,7 @@ Sample configuration containing all field values:
  RANDFILE              = $ENV::HOME/.rnd
 
  [ req ]
- default_bits          = 1024
+ default_bits          = 2048
  default_keyfile       = keyfile.pem
  distinguished_name    = req_distinguished_name
  attributes            = req_attributes
index 6d897da..3dfc55d 100644 (file)
@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ EVP_CIPHER_CTX_init() initializes cipher contex B<ctx>.
 EVP_EncryptInit_ex() sets up cipher context B<ctx> for encryption
 with cipher B<type> from ENGINE B<impl>. B<ctx> must be initialized
 before calling this function. B<type> is normally supplied
-by a function such as EVP_des_cbc(). If B<impl> is NULL then the
+by a function such as EVP_aes_256_cbc(). If B<impl> is NULL then the
 default implementation is used. B<key> is the symmetric key to use
 and B<iv> is the IV to use (if necessary), the actual number of bytes
 used for the key and IV depends on the cipher. It is possible to set
index 7d793e1..19112a5 100644 (file)
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ encrypted using this key.
 
 EVP_SealInit() initializes a cipher context B<ctx> for encryption
 with cipher B<type> using a random secret key and IV. B<type> is normally
-supplied by a function such as EVP_des_cbc(). The secret key is encrypted
+supplied by a function such as EVP_aes_256_cbc(). The secret key is encrypted
 using one or more public keys, this allows the same encrypted data to be
 decrypted using any of the corresponding private keys. B<ek> is an array of
 buffers where the public key encrypted secret key will be written, each buffer
index 5eb065c..7f6cd43 100644 (file)
@@ -192,7 +192,7 @@ to use the pointer value at all, as this kind of reference is a guarantee
 that the structure can not be deallocated until the reference is released.
 
 However, a structural reference provides no guarantee that the ENGINE is
-initiliased and able to use any of its cryptographic
+initialised and able to use any of its cryptographic
 implementations. Indeed it's quite possible that most ENGINEs will not
 initialise at all in typical environments, as ENGINEs are typically used to
 support specialised hardware. To use an ENGINE's functionality, you need a
@@ -201,8 +201,8 @@ specialised form of structural reference, because each functional reference
 implicitly contains a structural reference as well - however to avoid
 difficult-to-find programming bugs, it is recommended to treat the two
 kinds of reference independently. If you have a functional reference to an
-ENGINE, you have a guarantee that the ENGINE has been initialised ready to
-perform cryptographic operations and will remain uninitialised
+ENGINE, you have a guarantee that the ENGINE has been initialised and
+is ready to perform cryptographic operations, and will remain initialised
 until after you have released your reference.
 
 I<Structural references>
@@ -370,7 +370,7 @@ I<Using a specific ENGINE implementation>
 Here we'll assume an application has been configured by its user or admin
 to want to use the "ACME" ENGINE if it is available in the version of
 OpenSSL the application was compiled with. If it is available, it should be
-used by default for all RSA, DSA, and symmetric cipher operation, otherwise
+used by default for all RSA, DSA, and symmetric cipher operations, otherwise
 OpenSSL should use its builtin software as per usual. The following code
 illustrates how to approach this;
 
@@ -401,7 +401,7 @@ I<Automatically using builtin ENGINE implementations>
 
 Here we'll assume we want to load and register all ENGINE implementations
 bundled with OpenSSL, such that for any cryptographic algorithm required by
-OpenSSL - if there is an ENGINE that implements it and can be initialise,
+OpenSSL - if there is an ENGINE that implements it and can be initialised,
 it should be used. The following code illustrates how this can work;
 
  /* Load all bundled ENGINEs into memory and make them visible */