Remove SSLeay history, etc., from docs
[openssl.git] / doc / crypto / engine.pod
index 5eb065c..4d11b4a 100644 (file)
@@ -24,14 +24,8 @@ engine - ENGINE cryptographic module support
  void ENGINE_load_openssl(void);
  void ENGINE_load_dynamic(void);
  #ifndef OPENSSL_NO_STATIC_ENGINE
- void ENGINE_load_4758cca(void);
- void ENGINE_load_aep(void);
- void ENGINE_load_atalla(void);
  void ENGINE_load_chil(void);
- void ENGINE_load_cswift(void);
  void ENGINE_load_gmp(void);
- void ENGINE_load_nuron(void);
- void ENGINE_load_sureware(void);
  void ENGINE_load_ubsec(void);
  #endif
  void ENGINE_load_cryptodev(void);
@@ -192,7 +186,7 @@ to use the pointer value at all, as this kind of reference is a guarantee
 that the structure can not be deallocated until the reference is released.
 
 However, a structural reference provides no guarantee that the ENGINE is
-initiliased and able to use any of its cryptographic
+initialised and able to use any of its cryptographic
 implementations. Indeed it's quite possible that most ENGINEs will not
 initialise at all in typical environments, as ENGINEs are typically used to
 support specialised hardware. To use an ENGINE's functionality, you need a
@@ -201,8 +195,8 @@ specialised form of structural reference, because each functional reference
 implicitly contains a structural reference as well - however to avoid
 difficult-to-find programming bugs, it is recommended to treat the two
 kinds of reference independently. If you have a functional reference to an
-ENGINE, you have a guarantee that the ENGINE has been initialised ready to
-perform cryptographic operations and will remain uninitialised
+ENGINE, you have a guarantee that the ENGINE has been initialised and
+is ready to perform cryptographic operations, and will remain initialised
 until after you have released your reference.
 
 I<Structural references>
@@ -370,7 +364,7 @@ I<Using a specific ENGINE implementation>
 Here we'll assume an application has been configured by its user or admin
 to want to use the "ACME" ENGINE if it is available in the version of
 OpenSSL the application was compiled with. If it is available, it should be
-used by default for all RSA, DSA, and symmetric cipher operation, otherwise
+used by default for all RSA, DSA, and symmetric cipher operations, otherwise
 OpenSSL should use its builtin software as per usual. The following code
 illustrates how to approach this;
 
@@ -401,7 +395,7 @@ I<Automatically using builtin ENGINE implementations>
 
 Here we'll assume we want to load and register all ENGINE implementations
 bundled with OpenSSL, such that for any cryptographic algorithm required by
-OpenSSL - if there is an ENGINE that implements it and can be initialise,
+OpenSSL - if there is an ENGINE that implements it and can be initialised,
 it should be used. The following code illustrates how this can work;
 
  /* Load all bundled ENGINEs into memory and make them visible */
@@ -582,18 +576,8 @@ might query various ENGINEs to see if they implement "FOO_GET_VENDOR_LOGO_GIF" -
 and ENGINE could therefore decide whether or not to support this "foo"-specific
 extension).
 
-=head2 Future developments
-
-The ENGINE API and internal architecture is currently being reviewed. Slated for
-possible release in 0.9.8 is support for transparent loading of "dynamic"
-ENGINEs (built as self-contained shared-libraries). This would allow ENGINE
-implementations to be provided independently of OpenSSL libraries and/or
-OpenSSL-based applications, and would also remove any requirement for
-applications to explicitly use the "dynamic" ENGINE to bind to shared-library
-implementations.
-
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
-L<rsa(3)|rsa(3)>, L<dsa(3)|dsa(3)>, L<dh(3)|dh(3)>, L<rand(3)|rand(3)>
+L<rsa(3)>, L<dsa(3)>, L<dh(3)>, L<rand(3)>
 
 =cut