Update test config file
[openssl.git] / NOTES.WIN
index c204278..c31aed9 100644 (file)
--- a/NOTES.WIN
+++ b/NOTES.WIN
@@ -2,15 +2,17 @@
  NOTES FOR THE WINDOWS PLATFORMS
  ===============================
 
- [Notes for Windows CE can be found in INSTALL.WCE]
-
  Requirement details for native (Visual C++) builds
  --------------------------------------------------
 
+ In addition to the requirements and instructions listed in INSTALL,
+ this are required as well:
+
  - You need Perl.  We recommend ActiveState Perl, available from
-   http://www.activestate.com/ActivePerl.
+   https://www.activestate.com/ActivePerl. Another viable alternative
+   appears to be Strawberry Perl, http://strawberryperl.com.
    You also need the perl module Text::Template, available on CPAN.
-   Please read README.PERL for more information.
+   Please read NOTES.PERL for more information.
 
  - You need a C compiler.  OpenSSL has been tested to build with these:
 
    supported.
 
 
+ Visual C++ (native Windows)
+ ---------------------------
+
+ Installation directories
+
+ The default installation directories are derived from environment
+ variables.
+
+ For VC-WIN32, the following defaults are use:
+
+     PREFIX:      %ProgramFiles(86)%\OpenSSL
+     OPENSSLDIR:  %CommonProgramFiles(86)%\SSL
+
+ For VC-WIN64, the following defaults are use:
+
+     PREFIX:      %ProgramW6432%\OpenSSL
+     OPENSSLDIR:  %CommonProgramW6432%\SSL
+
+ Should those environment variables not exist (on a pure Win32
+ installation for examples), these fallbacks are used:
+
+     PREFIX:      %ProgramFiles%\OpenSSL
+     OPENSSLDIR:  %CommonProgramFiles%\SSL
+
+ ALSO NOTE that those directories are usually write protected, even if
+ your account is in the Administrators group.  To work around that,
+ start the command prompt by right-clicking on it and choosing "Run as
+ Administrator" before running 'nmake install'.  The other solution
+ is, of course, to choose a different set of directories by using
+ --prefix and --openssldir when configuring.
+
  GNU C (Cygwin)
  --------------
 
  Cygwin implements a Posix/Unix runtime system (cygwin1.dll) on top of the
  Windows subsystem and provides a bash shell and GNU tools environment.
  Consequently, a make of OpenSSL with Cygwin is virtually identical to the
- Unix procedure. It is also possible to create Windows binaries that only
- use the Microsoft C runtime system (msvcrt.dll or crtdll.dll) using
- MinGW. MinGW can be used in the Cygwin development environment or in a
- standalone setup as described in the following section.
+ Unix procedure.
 
  To build OpenSSL using Cygwin, you need to:
 
- * Install Cygwin (see http://cygwin.com/)
+ * Install Cygwin (see https://cygwin.com/)
 
- * Install Perl and ensure it is in the path. Both Cygwin perl
-   (5.6.1-2 or newer) and ActivePerl work.
+ * Install Cygwin Perl and ensure it is in the path. Recall that
+   as least 5.10.0 is required.
 
  * Run the Cygwin bash shell
 
  stripping of carriage returns. To avoid this ensure that a binary
  mount is used, e.g. mount -b c:\somewhere /home.
 
+ It is also possible to create "conventional" Windows binaries that use
+ the Microsoft C runtime system (msvcrt.dll or crtdll.dll) using MinGW
+ development add-on for Cygwin. MinGW is supported even as a standalone
+ setup as described in the following section. In the context you should
+ recognize that binaries targeting Cygwin itself are not interchangeable
+ with "conventional" Windows binaries you generate with/for MinGW.
+
 
  GNU C (MinGW/MSYS)
- -------------
+ ------------------
 
  * Compiler and shell environment installation:
 
    MinGW and MSYS are available from http://www.mingw.org/, both are
    required. Run the installers and do whatever magic they say it takes
-   to start MSYS bash shell with GNU tools on its PATH.
+   to start MSYS bash shell with GNU tools and matching Perl on its PATH.
+   "Matching Perl" refers to chosen "shell environment", i.e. if built
+   under MSYS, then Perl compiled for MSYS must be used.
 
-   Alternativelly, one can use MSYS2 from http://msys2.github.io/,
+   Alternatively, one can use MSYS2 from https://msys2.github.io/,
    which includes MingW (32-bit and 64-bit).
 
  * It is also possible to cross-compile it on Linux by configuring
  Linking your application
  ------------------------
 
+ This section applies to non-Cygwin builds.
+
  If you link with static OpenSSL libraries then you're expected to
- additionally link your application with WS2_32.LIB, ADVAPI32.LIB,
- GDI32.LIB and USER32.LIB. Those developing non-interactive service
- applications might feel concerned about linking with the latter two,
- as they are justly associated with interactive desktop, which is not
- available to service processes. The toolkit is designed to detect in
- which context it's currently executed, GUI, console app or service,
- and act accordingly, namely whether or not to actually make GUI calls.
- Additionally those who wish to /DELAYLOAD:GDI32.DLL and /DELAYLOAD:USER32.DLL
- and actually keep them off service process should consider
- implementing and exporting from .exe image in question own
- _OPENSSL_isservice not relying on USER32.DLL.
- E.g., on Windows Vista and later you could:
+ additionally link your application with WS2_32.LIB, GDI32.LIB,
+ ADVAPI32.LIB, CRYPT32.LIB and USER32.LIB. Those developing
+ non-interactive service applications might feel concerned about
+ linking with GDI32.LIB and USER32.LIB, as they are justly associated
+ with interactive desktop, which is not available to service
+ processes. The toolkit is designed to detect in which context it's
+ currently executed, GUI, console app or service, and act accordingly,
+ namely whether or not to actually make GUI calls. Additionally those
+ who wish to /DELAYLOAD:GDI32.DLL and /DELAYLOAD:USER32.DLL and
+ actually keep them off service process should consider implementing
+ and exporting from .exe image in question own _OPENSSL_isservice not
relying on USER32.DLL. E.g., on Windows Vista and later you could:
 
        __declspec(dllexport) __cdecl BOOL _OPENSSL_isservice(void)
        {   DWORD sess;
  your application code small "shim" snippet, which provides glue between
  OpenSSL BIO layer and your compiler run-time. See the OPENSSL_Applink
  manual page for further details.
-
-
- "Classic" builds (Visual C++)
- ----------------
-
- [OpenSSL was classically built using a script called mk1mf.  This is
-  still available by configuring with --classic.  The notes below are
-  using this flag, and are tentative.  Use with care.
-
-  NOTE: this won't be available for long.]
-
- If you want to compile in the assembly language routines with Visual
- C++, then you will need the Netwide Assembler binary, nasmw.exe or nasm.exe, to
- be available on your %PATH%.
-
- Firstly you should run Configure and generate the Makefiles. If you don't want
- the assembly language files then add the "no-asm" option (without quotes) to
- the Configure lines below.
-
- For Win32:
-
- > perl Configure VC-WIN32 --classic --prefix=c:\some\openssl\dir
- > ms\do_nasm
-
- Note: replace the last line above with the following if not using the assembly
- language files:
-
- > ms\do_ms
-
- For Win64/x64:
-
- > perl Configure VC-WIN64A --classic --prefix=c:\some\openssl\dir
- > ms\do_win64a
-
- For Win64/IA64:
-
- > perl Configure VC-WIN64I --classic --prefix=c:\some\openssl\dir
- > ms\do_win64i
-
- Where the prefix argument specifies where OpenSSL will be installed to.
-
- Then from the VC++ environment at a prompt do the following. Note, your %PATH%
- and other environment variables should be set up for 32-bit or 64-bit
- development as appropriate.
-
- > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak
-
- If all is well it should compile and you will have some DLLs and
- executables in out32dll. If you want to try the tests then do:
-
- > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak test
-
- To install OpenSSL to the specified location do:
-
- > nmake -f ms\ntdll.mak install
-
- Tweaks:
-
- There are various changes you can make to the Windows compile
- environment. By default the library is not compiled with debugging
- symbols. If you add --debug to the Configure lines above then debugging symbols
- will be compiled in.
-
- By default in 1.1.0 OpenSSL will compile builtin ENGINES into separate shared
- libraries. If you specify the "enable-static-engine" option on the command line
- to Configure the shared library build (ms\ntdll.mak) will compile the engines
- into libcrypto32.dll instead.
-
- You can also build a static version of the library using the Makefile
- ms\nt.mak