EC point multiplication: add `ladder` scaffold
[openssl.git] / INSTALL
diff --git a/INSTALL b/INSTALL
index de127df..51141ef 100644 (file)
--- a/INSTALL
+++ b/INSTALL
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
-
  OPENSSL INSTALLATION
  --------------------
 
  This document describes installation on all supported operating
- systems (the Linux/Unix family, OpenVMS and Windows)
+ systems (the Unix/Linux family (which includes Mac OS/X), OpenVMS,
+ and Windows).
 
  To install OpenSSL, you will need:
 
  For additional platform specific requirements, solutions to specific
  issues and other details, please read one of these:
 
+  * NOTES.UNIX (any supported Unix like system)
   * NOTES.VMS (OpenVMS)
   * NOTES.WIN (any supported Windows)
   * NOTES.DJGPP (DOS platform with DJGPP)
+  * NOTES.ANDROID (obviously Android [NDK])
 
  Notational conventions in this document
  ---------------------------------------
@@ -75,7 +77,7 @@
 
  If you want to just get on with it, do:
 
-  on Unix:
+  on Unix (again, this includes Mac OS/X):
 
     $ ./config
     $ make
 
     $ @config --prefix=PROGRAM:[INSTALLS] --openssldir=SYS$MANAGER:[OPENSSL]
 
+ (Note: if you do add options to the configuration command, please make sure
+ you've read more than just this Quick Start, such as relevant NOTES.* files,
+ the options outline below, as configuration options may change the outcome
+ in otherwise unexpected ways)
+
 
  Configuration Options
  ---------------------
                    without a path). This flag must be provided if the
                    zlib-dynamic option is not also used. If zlib-dynamic is used
                    then this flag is optional and a default value ("ZLIB1") is
-                   used if not provided. 
+                   used if not provided.
                    On VMS: this is the filename of the zlib library (with or
                    without a path). This flag is optional and if not provided
                    then "GNV$LIBZSHR", "GNV$LIBZSHR32" or "GNV$LIBZSHR64" is
                    used by default depending on the pointer size chosen.
 
+
+  --with-rand-seed=seed1[,seed2,...]
+                   A comma separated list of seeding methods which will be tried
+                   by OpenSSL in order to obtain random input (a.k.a "entropy")
+                   for seeding its cryptographically secure random number
+                   generator (CSPRNG). The current seeding methods are:
+
+                   os:         Use a trusted operating system entropy source.
+                               This is the default method if such an entropy
+                               source exists.
+                   getrandom:  Use the L<getrandom(2)> or equivalent system
+                               call.
+                   devrandom:  Use the the first device from the DEVRANDOM list
+                               which can be opened to read random bytes. The
+                               DEVRANDOM preprocessor constant expands to
+                               "/dev/urandom","/dev/random","/dev/srandom" on
+                               most unix-ish operating systems.
+                   egd:        Check for an entropy generating daemon.
+                   rdcpu:      Use the RDSEED or RDRAND command if provided by
+                               the CPU.
+                   librandom:  Use librandom (not implemented yet).
+                   none:       Disable automatic seeding. This is the default
+                               on some operating systems where no suitable
+                               entropy source exists, or no support for it is
+                               implemented yet.
+
+                   For more information, see the section 'Note on random number
+                   generation' at the end of this document.
+
   no-afalgeng
                    Don't build the AFALG engine. This option will be forced if
                    on a platform that does not support AFALG.
                    error strings. For a statically linked application this may
                    be undesirable if small executable size is an objective.
 
+  no-autoload-config
+                   Don't automatically load the default openssl.cnf file.
+                   Typically OpenSSL will automatically load a system config
+                   file which configures default ssl options.
 
   no-capieng
                    Don't build the CAPI engine. This option will be forced if
 
   enable-ec_nistp_64_gcc_128
                    Enable support for optimised implementations of some commonly
-                   used NIST elliptic curves. This is only supported on some
-                   platforms.
+                   used NIST elliptic curves.
+                   This is only supported on platforms:
+                   - with little-endian storage of non-byte types
+                   - that tolerate misaligned memory references
+                   - where the compiler:
+                     - supports the non-standard type __uint128_t
+                     - defines the built-in macro __SIZEOF_INT128__
 
   enable-egd
                    Build support for gathering entropy from EGD (Entropy
   no-err
                    Don't compile in any error strings.
 
+  enable-external-tests
+                   Enable building of integration with external test suites.
+                   This is a developer option and may not work on all platforms.
+                   The only supported external test suite at the current time is
+                   the BoringSSL test suite. See the file test/README.external
+                   for further details.
+
   no-filenames
                    Don't compile in filename and line number information (e.g.
                    for errors and memory allocation).
                    available if the GOST algorithms are also available through
                    loading an externally supplied engine.
 
-  enable-heartbeats
-                   Build support for DTLS heartbeats.
-
   no-hw-padlock
                    Don't build the padlock engine.
 
                    Don't build SRTP support
 
   no-sse2
-                   Exclude SSE2 code paths. Normally SSE2 extension is
-                   detected at run-time, but the decision whether or not the
-                   machine code will be executed is taken solely on CPU
-                   capability vector. This means that if you happen to run OS
-                   kernel which does not support SSE2 extension on Intel P4
-                   processor, then your application might be exposed to
-                   "illegal instruction" exception. There might be a way
-                   to enable support in kernel, e.g. FreeBSD kernel can be
-                   compiled with CPU_ENABLE_SSE, and there is a way to
-                   disengage SSE2 code paths upon application start-up,
-                   but if you aim for wider "audience" running such kernel,
-                   consider no-sse2. Both the 386 and no-asm options imply
-                   no-sse2.
+                   Exclude SSE2 code paths from 32-bit x86 assembly modules.
+                   Normally SSE2 extension is detected at run-time, but the
+                   decision whether or not the machine code will be executed
+                   is taken solely on CPU capability vector. This means that
+                   if you happen to run OS kernel which does not support SSE2
+                   extension on Intel P4 processor, then your application
+                   might be exposed to "illegal instruction" exception.
+                   There might be a way to enable support in kernel, e.g.
+                   FreeBSD kernel can  be compiled with CPU_ENABLE_SSE, and
+                   there is a way to disengage SSE2 code paths upon application
+                   start-up, but if you aim for wider "audience" running
+                   such kernel, consider no-sse2. Both the 386 and
+                   no-asm options imply no-sse2.
 
   enable-ssl-trace
                    Build with the SSL Trace capabilities (adds the "-trace"
                    has an impact when not built "shared".
 
   no-stdio
-                   Don't use any C "stdio" features. Only libcrypto and libssl
-                   can be built in this way. Using this option will suppress
+                   Don't use anything from the C header file "stdio.h" that
+                   makes use of the "FILE" type. Only libcrypto and libssl can
+                   be built in this way. Using this option will suppress
                    building the command line applications. Additionally since
                    the OpenSSL tests also use the command line applications the
                    tests will also be skipped.
 
+  no-tests
+                   Don't build test programs or run any test.
+
   no-threads
                    Don't try to build with support for multi-threaded
                    applications.
                    require additional system-dependent options! See "Note on
                    multi-threading" below.
 
+  enable-tls13downgrade
+                   TODO(TLS1.3): Make this enabled by default and remove the
+                   option when TLSv1.3 is out of draft
+                   TLSv1.3 offers a downgrade protection mechanism. This is
+                   implemented but disabled by default. It should not typically
+                   be enabled except for testing purposes. Otherwise this could
+                   cause problems if a pre-RFC version of OpenSSL talks to an
+                   RFC implementation (it will erroneously be detected as a
+                   downgrade).
+
   no-ts
                    Don't build Time Stamping Authority support.
 
                    where loading of shared libraries is supported.
 
   386
-                   On Intel hardware, use the 80386 instruction set only
-                   (the default x86 code is more efficient, but requires at
-                   least a 486). Note: Use compiler flags for any other CPU
-                   specific configuration, e.g. "-m32" to build x86 code on
-                   an x64 system.
+                   In 32-bit x86 builds, when generating assembly modules,
+                   use the 80386 instruction set only (the default x86 code
+                   is more efficient, but requires at least a 486). Note:
+                   This doesn't affect code generated by compiler, you're
+                   likely to complement configuration command line with
+                   suitable compiler-specific option.
 
   no-<prot>
                    Don't build support for negotiating the specified SSL/TLS
-                   protocol (one of ssl, ssl3, tls, tls1, tls1_1, tls1_2, dtls,
-                   dtls1 or dtls1_2). If "no-tls" is selected then all of tls1,
-                   tls1_1 and tls1_2 are disabled. Similarly "no-dtls" will
-                   disable dtls1 and dtls1_2. The "no-ssl" option is synonymous
-                   with "no-ssl3". Note this only affects version negotiation.
-                   OpenSSL will still provide the methods for applications to
-                   explicitly select the individual protocol versions.
+                   protocol (one of ssl, ssl3, tls, tls1, tls1_1, tls1_2,
+                   tls1_3, dtls, dtls1 or dtls1_2). If "no-tls" is selected then
+                   all of tls1, tls1_1, tls1_2 and tls1_3 are disabled.
+                   Similarly "no-dtls" will disable dtls1 and dtls1_2. The
+                   "no-ssl" option is synonymous with "no-ssl3". Note this only
+                   affects version negotiation. OpenSSL will still provide the
+                   methods for applications to explicitly select the individual
+                   protocol versions.
 
   no-<prot>-method
                    As for no-<prot> but in addition do not build the methods for
                    applications to explicitly select individual protocol
-                   versions.
+                   versions. Note that there is no "no-tls1_3-method" option
+                   because there is no application method for TLSv1.3. Using
+                   individual protocol methods directly is deprecated.
+                   Applications should use TLS_method() instead.
 
   enable-<alg>
                    Build with support for the specified algorithm, where <alg>
 
   no-<alg>
                    Build without support for the specified algorithm, where
-                   <alg> is one of: bf, blake2, camellia, cast, chacha, cmac,
-                   des, dh, dsa, ecdh, ecdsa, idea, md4, mdc2, ocb, poly1305,
-                   rc2, rc4, rmd160, scrypt, seed or whirlpool. The "ripemd"
-                   algorithm is deprecated and if used is synonymous with rmd160.
+                   <alg> is one of: aria, bf, blake2, camellia, cast, chacha,
+                   cmac, des, dh, dsa, ecdh, ecdsa, idea, md4, mdc2, ocb,
+                   poly1305, rc2, rc4, rmd160, scrypt, seed, siphash, sm2, sm3,
+                   sm4 or whirlpool.  The "ripemd" algorithm is deprecated and
+                   if used is synonymous with rmd160.
+
+  -Dxxx, -Ixxx, -Wp, -lxxx, -Lxxx, -Wl, -rpath, -R, -framework, -static
+                   These system specific options will be recognised and
+                   passed through to the compiler to allow you to define
+                   preprocessor symbols, specify additional libraries, library
+                   directories or other compiler options. It might be worth
+                   noting that some compilers generate code specifically for
+                   processor the compiler currently executes on. This is not
+                   necessarily what you might have in mind, since it might be
+                   unsuitable for execution on other, typically older,
+                   processor. Consult your compiler documentation.
+
+                   Take note of the VAR=value documentation below and how
+                   these flags interact with those variables.
+
+  -xxx, +xxx
+                   Additional options that are not otherwise recognised are
+                   passed through as they are to the compiler as well.  Again,
+                   consult your compiler documentation.
+
+                   Take note of the VAR=value documentation below and how
+                   these flags interact with those variables.
+
+  VAR=value
+                   Assignment of environment variable for Configure.  These
+                   work just like normal environment variable assignments,
+                   but are supported on all platforms and are confined to
+                   the configuration scripts only.  These assignments override
+                   the corresponding value in the inherited environment, if
+                   there is one.
+
+                   The following variables are used as "make variables" and
+                   can be used as an alternative to giving preprocessor,
+                   compiler and linker options directly as configuration.
+                   The following variables are supported:
+
+                   AR              The static library archiver.
+                   ARFLAGS         Flags for the static library archiver.
+                   AS              The assembler compiler.
+                   ASFLAGS         Flags for the assembler compiler.
+                   CC              The C compiler.
+                   CFLAGS          Flags for the C compiler.
+                   CXX             The C++ compiler.
+                   CXXFLAGS        Flags for the C++ compiler.
+                   CPP             The C/C++ preprocessor.
+                   CPPFLAGS        Flags for the C/C++ preprocessor.
+                   CPPDEFINES      List of CPP macro definitions, separated
+                                   by a platform specific character (':' or
+                                   space for Unix, ';' for Windows, ',' for
+                                   VMS).  This can be used instead of using
+                                   -D (or what corresponds to that on your
+                                   compiler) in CPPFLAGS.
+                   CPPINCLUDES     List of CPP inclusion directories, separated
+                                   the same way as for CPPDEFINES.  This can
+                                   be used instead of -I (or what corresponds
+                                   to that on your compiler) in CPPFLAGS.
+                   HASHBANGPERL    Perl invocation to be inserted after '#!'
+                                   in public perl scripts (only relevant on
+                                   Unix).
+                   LD              The program linker (not used on Unix, $(CC)
+                                   is used there).
+                   LDFLAGS         Flags for the shared library, DSO and
+                                   program linker.
+                   LDLIBS          Extra libraries to use when linking.
+                                   Takes the form of a space separated list
+                                   of library specifications on Unix and
+                                   Windows, and as a comma separated list of
+                                   libraries on VMS.
+                   RANLIB          The library archive indexer.
+                   RC              The Windows resources manipulator.
+                   RCFLAGS         Flags for the Windows reources manipulator.
+                   RM              The command to remove files and directories.
+
+                   These cannot be mixed with compiling / linking flags given
+                   on the command line.  In other words, something like this
+                   isn't permitted.
+
+                       ./config -DFOO CPPFLAGS=-DBAR -DCOOKIE
+
+                   Backward compatibility note:
+
+                   To be compatible with older configuration scripts, the
+                   environment variables are ignored if compiling / linking
+                   flags are given on the command line, except for these:
+
+                   AR, CC, CXX, CROSS_COMPILE, HASHBANGPERL, PERL, RANLIB, RC
+                   and WINDRES
+
+                   For example, the following command will not see -DBAR:
+
+                        CPPFLAGS=-DBAR ./config -DCOOKIE
+
+                   However, the following will see both set variables:
+
+                        CC=gcc CROSS_COMPILE=x86_64-w64-mingw32- \
+                        ./config -DCOOKIE
+
+  reconf
+  reconfigure
+                   Reconfigure from earlier data.  This fetches the previous
+                   command line options and environment from data saved in
+                   "configdata.pm", and runs the configuration process again,
+                   using these options and environment.
+                   Note: NO other option is permitted together with "reconf".
+                   This means that you also MUST use "./Configure" (or
+                   what corresponds to that on non-Unix platforms) directly
+                   to invoke this option.
+                   Note: The original configuration saves away values for ALL
+                   environment variables that were used, and if they weren't
+                   defined, they are still saved away with information that
+                   they weren't originally defined.  This information takes
+                   precedence over environment variables that are defined
+                   when reconfiguring.
+
+ Displaying configuration data
+ -----------------------------
+
+ The configuration script itself will say very little, and finishes by
+ creating "configdata.pm".  This perl module can be loaded by other scripts
+ to find all the configuration data, and it can also be used as a script to
+ display all sorts of configuration data in a human readable form.
+
+ For more information, please do:
+
+       $ ./configdata.pm --help                         # Unix
 
-  -Dxxx, -lxxx, -Lxxx, -fxxx, -mXXX, -Kxxx
-                   These system specific options will be passed through to the
-                   compiler to allow you to define preprocessor symbols, specify
-                   additional libraries, library directories or other compiler
-                   options.
+       or
 
+       $ perl configdata.pm --help                      # Windows and VMS
 
  Installation in Detail
  ----------------------
      ("openssl"). The libraries will be built in the top-level directory,
      and the binary will be in the "apps" subdirectory.
 
-     If the build fails, look at the output.  There may be reasons for
-     the failure that aren't problems in OpenSSL itself (like missing
-     standard headers).  If you are having problems you can get help by
-     sending an email to the openssl-users email list (see
-     https://www.openssl.org/community/mailinglists.html for details). If it
-     is a bug with OpenSSL itself, please report the problem to
-     <rt@openssl.org> (note that your message will be recorded in the request
-     tracker publicly readable at
-     https://www.openssl.org/community/index.html#bugs and will be
-     forwarded to a public mailing list). Please check out the request
-     tracker. Maybe the bug was already reported or has already been
-     fixed.
+     Troubleshooting:
+
+     If the build fails, look at the output.  There may be reasons
+     for the failure that aren't problems in OpenSSL itself (like
+     missing standard headers).
+
+     If the build succeeded previously, but fails after a source or
+     configuration change, it might be helpful to clean the build tree
+     before attempting another build. Use this command:
 
-     (If you encounter assembler error messages, try the "no-asm"
-     configuration option as an immediate fix.)
+       $ make clean                                     # Unix
+       $ mms clean                                      ! (or mmk) OpenVMS
+       $ nmake clean                                    # Windows
+
+     Assembler error messages can sometimes be sidestepped by using the
+     "no-asm" configuration option.
 
      Compiling parts of OpenSSL with gcc and others with the system
      compiler will result in unresolved symbols on some systems.
 
+     If you are still having problems you can get help by sending an email
+     to the openssl-users email list (see
+     https://www.openssl.org/community/mailinglists.html for details). If
+     it is a bug with OpenSSL itself, please open an issue on GitHub, at
+     https://github.com/openssl/openssl/issues. Please review the existing
+     ones first; maybe the bug was already reported or has already been
+     fixed.
+
   3. After a successful build, the libraries should be tested. Run:
 
        $ make test                                      # Unix
        $ nmake TESTS='test_rsa test_dsa' test           # Windows
 
      And of course, you can combine (Unix example shown):
-       
+
        $ make VERBOSE=1 TESTS='test_rsa test_dsa' test
 
      You can find the list of available tests like this:
      compiler optimization flags from the CFLAGS line in Makefile and
      run "make clean; make" or corresponding.
 
-     Please send bug reports to <rt@openssl.org>.
+     To report a bug please open an issue on GitHub, at
+     https://github.com/openssl/openssl/issues.
 
      For more details on how the make variables TESTS can be used,
      see section TESTS in Detail below.
                         command symbols.
          [.SYSTEST]     Contains the installation verification procedure.
          [.HTML]        Contains the HTML rendition of the manual pages.
-                        
+
 
      Additionally, install will add the following directories under
      OPENSSLDIR (the directory given with --openssldir or its default)
                 possible to create your own ".conf" and ".tmpl" files and store
                 them locally, outside the OpenSSL source tree. This environment
                 variable can be set to the directory where these files are held
-                and will have Configure to consider them in addition to the
-                standard ones.
+                and will be considered by Configure before it looks in the
+                standard directories.
 
  PERL
                 The name of the Perl executable to use when building OpenSSL.
  uninstall
                 Uninstall all OpenSSL components.
 
+ reconfigure
+ reconf
+                Re-run the configuration process, as exactly as the last time
+                as possible.
+
  update
                 This is a developer option. If you are developing a patch for
                 OpenSSL you may need to use this if you want to update
  -xxx           Removes 'xxx' from the current set of tests.  If this is the
                 first token in the list, the current set of tests is first
                 assigned the whole set of available tests, effectively making
-                this token equivalent to TESTS="alltests -xxx"
+                this token equivalent to TESTS="alltests -xxx".
+ nn             Adds the test group 'nn' (which is a number) to the current
+                set of tests.
+ -nn            Removes the test group 'nn' from the current set of tests.
+                If this is the first token in the list, the current set of
+                tests is first assigned the whole set of available tests,
+                effectively making this token equivalent to
+                TESTS="alltests -xxx".
 
  Also, all tokens except for "alltests" may have wildcards, such as *.
  (on Unix and Windows, BSD style wildcards are supported, while on VMS,
 
  $ make TESTS='test_ssl* -test_ssl_*' test
 
+ Example: Only test group 10:
+
+ $ make TESTS='10'
+
+ Example: All tests except the slow group (group 99):
+
+ $ make TESTS='-99'
+
+ Example: All tests in test groups 80 to 99 except for tests in group 90:
+
+ $ make TESTS='[89]? -90'
+
  Note on multi-threading
  -----------------------
 
  and libssl-1_1-x64.dll for 64-bit x86_64 Windows, and libcrypto-1_1-ia64.dll
  and libssl-1_1-ia64.dll for IA64 Windows.  With MSVC, the import libraries
  are named libcrypto.lib and libssl.lib, while with MingW, they are named
- libcrypto.dll.a and libddl.dll.a.
+ libcrypto.dll.a and libssl.dll.a.
 
  On VMS, shareable images (VMS speak for shared libraries) are named
  ossl$libcrypto0101_shr.exe and ossl$libssl0101_shr.exe.  However, when
 
  Availability of cryptographically secure random numbers is required for
  secret key generation. OpenSSL provides several options to seed the
- internal PRNG. If not properly seeded, the internal PRNG will refuse
+ internal CSPRNG. If not properly seeded, the internal CSPRNG will refuse
  to deliver random bytes and a "PRNG not seeded error" will occur.
- On systems without /dev/urandom (or similar) device, it may be necessary
- to install additional support software to obtain a random seed.
- Please check out the manual pages for RAND_add(), RAND_bytes(), RAND_egd(),
- and the FAQ for more information.
 
+ The seeding method can be configured using the --with-rand-seed option,
+ which can be used to specify a comma separated list of seed methods.
+ However in most cases OpenSSL will choose a suitable default method,
+ so it is not necessary to explicitely provide this option. Note also
+ that not all methods are available on all platforms.
+
+ I) On operating systems which provide a suitable randomness source (in
+ form  of a system call or system device), OpenSSL will use the optimal
+ available  method to seed the CSPRNG from the operating system's
+ randomness sources. This corresponds to the option --with-rand-seed=os.
+
+ II) On systems without such a suitable randomness source, automatic seeding
+ and reseeding is disabled (--with-rand-seed=none) and it may be necessary
+ to install additional support software to obtain a random seed and reseed
+ the CSPRNG manually.  Please check out the manual pages for RAND_add(),
+ RAND_bytes(), RAND_egd(), and the FAQ for more information.