Add final(?) set of copyrights.
[openssl.git] / crypto / rc2 / rrc2.doc
1 >From cygnus.mincom.oz.au!minbne.mincom.oz.au!bunyip.cc.uq.oz.au!munnari.OZ.AU!comp.vuw.ac.nz!waikato!auckland.ac.nz!news Mon Feb 12 18:48:17 EST 1996
2 Article 23601 of sci.crypt:
3 Path: cygnus.mincom.oz.au!minbne.mincom.oz.au!bunyip.cc.uq.oz.au!munnari.OZ.AU!comp.vuw.ac.nz!waikato!auckland.ac.nz!news
4 >From: pgut01@cs.auckland.ac.nz (Peter Gutmann)
5 Newsgroups: sci.crypt
6 Subject: Specification for Ron Rivests Cipher No.2
7 Date: 11 Feb 1996 06:45:03 GMT
8 Organization: University of Auckland
9 Lines: 203
10 Sender: pgut01@cs.auckland.ac.nz (Peter Gutmann)
11 Message-ID: <4fk39f$f70@net.auckland.ac.nz>
12 NNTP-Posting-Host: cs26.cs.auckland.ac.nz
13 X-Newsreader: NN version 6.5.0 #3 (NOV)
14
15
16
17
18                            Ron Rivest's Cipher No.2
19                            ------------------------
20  
21 Ron Rivest's Cipher No.2 (hereafter referred to as RRC.2, other people may
22 refer to it by other names) is word oriented, operating on a block of 64 bits
23 divided into four 16-bit words, with a key table of 64 words.  All data units
24 are little-endian.  This functional description of the algorithm is based in
25 the paper "The RC5 Encryption Algorithm" (RC5 is a trademark of RSADSI), using
26 the same general layout, terminology, and pseudocode style.
27  
28  
29 Notation and RRC.2 Primitive Operations
30  
31 RRC.2 uses the following primitive operations:
32  
33 1. Two's-complement addition of words, denoted by "+".  The inverse operation,
34    subtraction, is denoted by "-".
35 2. Bitwise exclusive OR, denoted by "^".
36 3. Bitwise AND, denoted by "&".
37 4. Bitwise NOT, denoted by "~".
38 5. A left-rotation of words; the rotation of word x left by y is denoted
39    x <<< y.  The inverse operation, right-rotation, is denoted x >>> y.
40  
41 These operations are directly and efficiently supported by most processors.
42  
43  
44 The RRC.2 Algorithm
45  
46 RRC.2 consists of three components, a *key expansion* algorithm, an
47 *encryption* algorithm, and a *decryption* algorithm.
48  
49  
50 Key Expansion
51  
52 The purpose of the key-expansion routine is to expand the user's key K to fill
53 the expanded key array S, so S resembles an array of random binary words
54 determined by the user's secret key K.
55  
56 Initialising the S-box
57  
58 RRC.2 uses a single 256-byte S-box derived from the ciphertext contents of
59 Beale Cipher No.1 XOR'd with a one-time pad.  The Beale Ciphers predate modern
60 cryptography by enough time that there should be no concerns about trapdoors
61 hidden in the data.  They have been published widely, and the S-box can be
62 easily recreated from the one-time pad values and the Beale Cipher data taken
63 from a standard source.  To initialise the S-box:
64  
65   for i = 0 to 255 do
66     sBox[ i ] = ( beale[ i ] mod 256 ) ^ pad[ i ]
67  
68 The contents of Beale Cipher No.1 and the necessary one-time pad are given as
69 an appendix at the end of this document.  For efficiency, implementors may wish
70 to skip the Beale Cipher expansion and store the sBox table directly.
71  
72 Expanding the Secret Key to 128 Bytes
73  
74 The secret key is first expanded to fill 128 bytes (64 words).  The expansion
75 consists of taking the sum of the first and last bytes in the user key, looking
76 up the sum (modulo 256) in the S-box, and appending the result to the key.  The
77 operation is repeated with the second byte and new last byte of the key until
78 all 128 bytes have been generated.  Note that the following pseudocode treats
79 the S array as an array of 128 bytes rather than 64 words.
80  
81   for j = 0 to length-1 do
82     S[ j ] = K[ j ]
83   for j = length to 127 do
84     s[ j ] = sBox[ ( S[ j-length ] + S[ j-1 ] ) mod 256 ];
85  
86 At this point it is possible to perform a truncation of the effective key
87 length to ease the creation of espionage-enabled software products.  However
88 since the author cannot conceive why anyone would want to do this, it will not
89 be considered further.
90  
91 The final phase of the key expansion involves replacing the first byte of S
92 with the entry selected from the S-box:
93  
94   S[ 0 ] = sBox[ S[ 0 ] ]
95  
96  
97 Encryption
98  
99 The cipher has 16 full rounds, each divided into 4 subrounds.  Two of the full
100 rounds perform an additional transformation on the data.  Note that the
101 following pseudocode treats the S array as an array of 64 words rather than 128
102 bytes.
103  
104   for i = 0 to 15 do
105     j = i * 4;
106     word0 = ( word0 + ( word1 & ~word3 ) + ( word2 & word3 ) + S[ j+0 ] ) <<< 1
107     word1 = ( word1 + ( word2 & ~word0 ) + ( word3 & word0 ) + S[ j+1 ] ) <<< 2
108     word2 = ( word2 + ( word3 & ~word1 ) + ( word0 & word1 ) + S[ j+2 ] ) <<< 3
109     word3 = ( word3 + ( word0 & ~word2 ) + ( word1 & word2 ) + S[ j+3 ] ) <<< 5
110  
111 In addition the fifth and eleventh rounds add the contents of the S-box indexed
112 by one of the data words to another of the data words following the four
113 subrounds as follows:
114  
115     word0 = word0 + S[ word3 & 63 ];
116     word1 = word1 + S[ word0 & 63 ];
117     word2 = word2 + S[ word1 & 63 ];
118     word3 = word3 + S[ word2 & 63 ];
119  
120  
121 Decryption
122  
123 The decryption operation is simply the inverse of the encryption operation.
124 Note that the following pseudocode treats the S array as an array of 64 words
125 rather than 128 bytes.
126  
127   for i = 15 downto 0 do
128     j = i * 4;
129     word3 = ( word3 >>> 5 ) - ( word0 & ~word2 ) - ( word1 & word2 ) - S[ j+3 ]
130     word2 = ( word2 >>> 3 ) - ( word3 & ~word1 ) - ( word0 & word1 ) - S[ j+2 ]
131     word1 = ( word1 >>> 2 ) - ( word2 & ~word0 ) - ( word3 & word0 ) - S[ j+1 ]
132     word0 = ( word0 >>> 1 ) - ( word1 & ~word3 ) - ( word2 & word3 ) - S[ j+0 ]
133  
134 In addition the fifth and eleventh rounds subtract the contents of the S-box
135 indexed by one of the data words from another one of the data words following
136 the four subrounds as follows:
137  
138     word3 = word3 - S[ word2 & 63 ]
139     word2 = word2 - S[ word1 & 63 ]
140     word1 = word1 - S[ word0 & 63 ]
141     word0 = word0 - S[ word3 & 63 ]
142  
143  
144 Test Vectors
145  
146 The following test vectors may be used to test the correctness of an RRC.2
147 implementation:
148  
149   Key:      0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
150             0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00
151   Plain:    0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00
152   Cipher:   0x1C, 0x19, 0x8A, 0x83, 0x8D, 0xF0, 0x28, 0xB7
153  
154   Key:      0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
155             0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x01
156   Plain:    0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00
157   Cipher:   0x21, 0x82, 0x9C, 0x78, 0xA9, 0xF9, 0xC0, 0x74
158  
159   Key:      0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
160             0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00
161   Plain:    0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF
162   Cipher:   0x13, 0xDB, 0x35, 0x17, 0xD3, 0x21, 0x86, 0x9E
163  
164   Key:      0x00, 0x01, 0x02, 0x03, 0x04, 0x05, 0x06, 0x07,
165             0x08, 0x09, 0x0A, 0x0B, 0x0C, 0x0D, 0x0E, 0x0F
166   Plain:    0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00
167   Cipher:   0x50, 0xDC, 0x01, 0x62, 0xBD, 0x75, 0x7F, 0x31
168  
169  
170 Appendix: Beale Cipher No.1, "The Locality of the Vault", and One-time Pad for
171           Creating the S-Box
172  
173 Beale Cipher No.1.
174  
175   71, 194,  38,1701,  89,  76,  11,  83,1629,  48,  94,  63, 132,  16, 111,  95,
176   84, 341, 975,  14,  40,  64,  27,  81, 139, 213,  63,  90,1120,   8,  15,   3,
177  126,2018,  40,  74, 758, 485, 604, 230, 436, 664, 582, 150, 251, 284, 308, 231,
178  124, 211, 486, 225, 401, 370,  11, 101, 305, 139, 189,  17,  33,  88, 208, 193,
179  145,   1,  94,  73, 416, 918, 263,  28, 500, 538, 356, 117, 136, 219,  27, 176,
180  130,  10, 460,  25, 485,  18, 436,  65,  84, 200, 283, 118, 320, 138,  36, 416,
181  280,  15,  71, 224, 961,  44,  16, 401,  39,  88,  61, 304,  12,  21,  24, 283,
182  134,  92,  63, 246, 486, 682,   7, 219, 184, 360, 780,  18,  64, 463, 474, 131,
183  160,  79,  73, 440,  95,  18,  64, 581,  34,  69, 128, 367, 460,  17,  81,  12,
184  103, 820,  62, 110,  97, 103, 862,  70,  60,1317, 471, 540, 208, 121, 890, 346,
185   36, 150,  59, 568, 614,  13, 120,  63, 219, 812,2160,1780,  99,  35,  18,  21,
186  136, 872,  15,  28, 170,  88,   4,  30,  44, 112,  18, 147, 436, 195, 320,  37,
187  122, 113,   6, 140,   8, 120, 305,  42,  58, 461,  44, 106, 301,  13, 408, 680,
188   93,  86, 116, 530,  82, 568,   9, 102,  38, 416,  89,  71, 216, 728, 965, 818,
189    2,  38, 121, 195,  14, 326, 148, 234,  18,  55, 131, 234, 361, 824,   5,  81,
190  623,  48, 961,  19,  26,  33,  10,1101, 365,  92,  88, 181, 275, 346, 201, 206
191  
192 One-time Pad.
193  
194  158, 186, 223,  97,  64, 145, 190, 190, 117, 217, 163,  70, 206, 176, 183, 194,
195  146,  43, 248, 141,   3,  54,  72, 223, 233, 153,  91, 210,  36, 131, 244, 161,
196  105, 120, 113, 191, 113,  86,  19, 245, 213, 221,  43,  27, 242, 157,  73, 213,
197  193,  92, 166,  10,  23, 197, 112, 110, 193,  30, 156,  51, 125,  51, 158,  67,
198  197, 215,  59, 218, 110, 246, 181,   0, 135,  76, 164,  97,  47,  87, 234, 108,
199  144, 127,   6,   6, 222, 172,  80, 144,  22, 245, 207,  70, 227, 182, 146, 134,
200  119, 176,  73,  58, 135,  69,  23, 198,   0, 170,  32, 171, 176, 129,  91,  24,
201  126,  77, 248,   0, 118,  69,  57,  60, 190, 171, 217,  61, 136, 169, 196,  84,
202  168, 167, 163, 102, 223,  64, 174, 178, 166, 239, 242, 195, 249,  92,  59,  38,
203  241,  46, 236,  31,  59, 114,  23,  50, 119, 186,   7,  66, 212,  97, 222, 182,
204  230, 118, 122,  86, 105,  92, 179, 243, 255, 189, 223, 164, 194, 215,  98,  44,
205   17,  20,  53, 153, 137, 224, 176, 100, 208, 114,  36, 200, 145, 150, 215,  20,
206   87,  44, 252,  20, 235, 242, 163, 132,  63,  18,   5, 122,  74,  97,  34,  97,
207  142,  86, 146, 221, 179, 166, 161,  74,  69, 182,  88, 120, 128,  58,  76, 155,
208   15,  30,  77, 216, 165, 117, 107,  90, 169, 127, 143, 181, 208, 137, 200, 127,
209  170, 195,  26,  84, 255, 132, 150,  58, 103, 250, 120, 221, 237,  37,   8,  99
210  
211  
212 Implementation
213  
214 A non-US based programmer who has never seen any encryption code before will
215 shortly be implementing RRC.2 based solely on this specification and not on
216 knowledge of any other encryption algorithms.  Stand by.
217
218
219