make update
[openssl.git] / Configurations / README
1 Intro
2 =====
3
4 This directory contains a few sets of files that are used for
5 configuration in diverse ways:
6
7     *.conf      Target platform configurations, please read
8                 'Configurations of OpenSSL target platforms' for more
9                 information.
10     *.tmpl      Build file templates, please read 'Build-file
11                 programming with the "unified" build system' as well
12                 as 'Build info files' for more information.
13     *.pm        Helper scripts / modules for the main `Configure`
14                 script.  See 'Configure helper scripts for more
15                 information.
16
17
18 Configurations of OpenSSL target platforms
19 ==========================================
20
21 Target configurations are a collection of facts that we know about
22 different platforms and their capabilities.  We organise them in a
23 hash table, where each entry represent a specific target.
24
25 In each table entry, the following keys are significant:
26
27         inherit_from    => Other targets to inherit values from.
28                            Explained further below. [1]
29         template        => Set to 1 if this isn't really a platform
30                            target.  Instead, this target is a template
31                            upon which other targets can be built.
32                            Explained further below.  [1]
33
34         sys_id          => System identity for systems where that
35                            is difficult to determine automatically.
36
37         cc              => The C compiler command, usually one of "cc",
38                            "gcc" or "clang".  This command is normally
39                            also used to link object files and
40                            libraries into the final program.
41         cxx             => The C++ compiler command, usually one of
42                            "c++", "g++" or "clang++".  This command is
43                            also used when linking a program where at
44                            least one of the object file is made from
45                            C++ source.
46         cflags          => Flags that are used at all times when
47                            compiling C object files.
48         cxxflags        => Flags that are used at all times when
49                            compiling C++ object files.  If unset, it
50                            gets the same value as cflags.
51         defines         => As an alternative, macro definitions may be
52                            present here instead of in `cflags'.  If
53                            given here, they MUST be as an array of the
54                            string such as "MACRO=value", or just
55                            "MACRO" for definitions without value.
56         shared_cflag    => Extra compilation flags used when
57                            compiling for shared libraries, typically
58                            something like "-fPIC".
59
60         (linking is a complex thing, see [3] below)
61         ld              => Linker command, usually not defined
62                            (meaning the compiler command is used
63                            instead).
64                            (NOTE: this is here for future use, it's
65                            not implemented yet)
66         lflags          => Flags that are used when linking apps.
67         shared_ldflag   => Flags that are used when linking shared
68                            or dynamic libraries.
69         plib_lflags     => Extra linking flags to appear just before
70                            the libraries on the command line.
71         ex_libs         => Extra libraries that are needed when
72                            linking.
73
74         ar              => The library archive command, the default is
75                            "ar".
76                            (NOTE: this is here for future use, it's
77                            not implemented yet)
78         arflags         => Flags to be used with the library archive
79                            command.
80
81         ranlib          => The library archive indexing command, the
82                            default is 'ranlib' it it exists.
83
84         unistd          => An alternative header to the typical
85                            '<unistd.h>'.  This is very rarely needed.
86
87         shared_extension => File name extension used for shared
88                             libraries. 
89         obj_extension   => File name extension used for object files.
90                            On unix, this defaults to ".o" (NOTE: this
91                            is here for future use, it's not
92                            implemented yet)
93         exe_extension   => File name extension used for executable
94                            files.  On unix, this defaults to "" (NOTE:
95                            this is here for future use, it's not
96                            implemented yet)
97
98         thread_scheme   => The type of threads is used on the
99                            configured platform.  Currently known
100                            values are "(unknown)", "pthreads",
101                            "uithreads" (a.k.a solaris threads) and
102                            "winthreads".  Except for "(unknown)", the
103                            actual value is currently ignored but may
104                            be used in the future.  See further notes
105                            below [2].
106         dso_scheme      => The type of dynamic shared objects to build
107                            for.  This mostly comes into play with
108                            engines, but can be used for other purposes
109                            as well.  Valid values are "DLFCN"
110                            (dlopen() et al), "DLFCN_NO_H" (for systems
111                            that use dlopen() et al but do not have
112                            fcntl.h), "DL" (shl_load() et al), "WIN32"
113                            and "VMS".
114         perlasm_scheme  => The perlasm method used to created the
115                            assembler files used when compiling with
116                            assembler implementations.
117         shared_target   => The shared library building method used.
118                            This is a target found in Makefile.shared.
119         build_scheme    => The scheme used to build up a Makefile.
120                            In its simplest form, the value is a string
121                            with the name of the build scheme.
122                            The value may also take the form of a list
123                            of strings, if the build_scheme is to have
124                            some options.  In this case, the first
125                            string in the list is the name of the build
126                            scheme.
127                            Currently recognised build scheme is "unified".
128                            For the "unified" build scheme, this item
129                            *must* be an array with the first being the
130                            word "unified" and the second being a word
131                            to identify the platform family.
132
133         multilib        => On systems that support having multiple
134                            implementations of a library (typically a
135                            32-bit and a 64-bit variant), this is used
136                            to have the different variants in different
137                            directories.
138
139         bn_ops          => Building options (was just bignum options in
140                            the earlier history of this option, hence the
141                            name). This is a string of words that describe
142                            algorithms' implementation parameters that
143                            are optimal for the designated target platform,
144                            such as the type of integers used to build up
145                            the bignum, different ways to implement certain
146                            ciphers and so on. To fully comprehend the
147                            meaning, the best is to read the affected
148                            source.
149                            The valid words are:
150
151                            THIRTY_TWO_BIT       bignum limbs are 32 bits,
152                                                 this is default if no
153                                                 option is specified, it
154                                                 works on any supported
155                                                 system [unless "wider"
156                                                 limb size is implied in
157                                                 assembly code];
158                            BN_LLONG             bignum limbs are 32 bits,
159                                                 but 64-bit 'unsigned long
160                                                 long' is used internally
161                                                 in calculations;
162                            SIXTY_FOUR_BIT_LONG  bignum limbs are 64 bits
163                                                 and sizeof(long) is 8;
164                            SIXTY_FOUR_BIT       bignums limbs are 64 bits,
165                                                 but execution environment
166                                                 is ILP32;
167                            RC4_CHAR             RC4 key schedule is made
168                                                 up of 'unsigned char's;
169                            RC4_INT              RC4 key schedule is made
170                                                 up of 'unsigned int's;
171                            EXPORT_VAR_AS_FN     for shared libraries,
172                                                 export vars as
173                                                 accessor functions.
174
175         apps_extra_src  => Extra source to build apps/openssl, as
176                            needed by the target.
177         cpuid_asm_src   => assembler implementation of cpuid code as
178                            well as OPENSSL_cleanse().
179                            Default to mem_clr.c
180         bn_asm_src      => Assembler implementation of core bignum
181                            functions.
182                            Defaults to bn_asm.c
183         ec_asm_src      => Assembler implementation of core EC
184                            functions.
185         des_asm_src     => Assembler implementation of core DES
186                            encryption functions.
187                            Defaults to 'des_enc.c fcrypt_b.c'
188         aes_asm_src     => Assembler implementation of core AES
189                            functions.
190                            Defaults to 'aes_core.c aes_cbc.c'
191         bf_asm_src      => Assembler implementation of core BlowFish
192                            functions.
193                            Defaults to 'bf_enc.c'
194         md5_asm_src     => Assembler implementation of core MD5
195                            functions.
196         sha1_asm_src    => Assembler implementation of core SHA1,
197                            functions, and also possibly SHA256 and
198                            SHA512 ones.
199         cast_asm_src    => Assembler implementation of core CAST
200                            functions.
201                            Defaults to 'c_enc.c'
202         rc4_asm_src     => Assembler implementation of core RC4
203                            functions.
204                            Defaults to 'rc4_enc.c rc4_skey.c'
205         rmd160_asm_src  => Assembler implementation of core RMD160
206                            functions.
207         rc5_asm_src     => Assembler implementation of core RC5
208                            functions.
209                            Defaults to 'rc5_enc.c'
210         wp_asm_src      => Assembler implementation of core WHIRLPOOL
211                            functions.
212         cmll_asm_src    => Assembler implementation of core CAMELLIA
213                            functions.
214                            Defaults to 'camellia.c cmll_misc.c cmll_cbc.c'
215         modes_asm_src   => Assembler implementation of cipher modes,
216                            currently the functions gcm_gmult_4bit and
217                            gcm_ghash_4bit.
218         padlock_asm_src => Assembler implementation of core parts of
219                            the padlock engine.  This is mandatory on
220                            any platform where the padlock engine might
221                            actually be built.
222
223
224 [1] as part of the target configuration, one can have a key called
225     'inherit_from' that indicate what other configurations to inherit
226     data from.  These are resolved recursively.
227
228     Inheritance works as a set of default values that can be overridden
229     by corresponding key values in the inheriting configuration.
230
231     Note 1: any configuration table can be used as a template.
232     Note 2: pure templates have the attribute 'template => 1' and
233             cannot be used as build targets.
234
235     If several configurations are given in the 'inherit_from' array,
236     the values of same attribute are concatenated with space
237     separation.  With this, it's possible to have several smaller
238     templates for different configuration aspects that can be combined
239     into a complete configuration.
240
241     instead of a scalar value or an array, a value can be a code block
242     of the form 'sub { /* your code here */ }'.  This code block will
243     be called with the list of inherited values for that key as
244     arguments.  In fact, the concatenation of strings is really done
245     by using 'sub { join(" ",@_) }' on the list of inherited values.
246
247     An example:
248
249         "foo" => {
250                 template => 1,
251                 haha => "ha ha",
252                 hoho => "ho",
253                 ignored => "This should not appear in the end result",
254         },
255         "bar" => {
256                 template => 1,
257                 haha => "ah",
258                 hoho => "haho",
259                 hehe => "hehe"
260         },
261         "laughter" => {
262                 inherit_from => [ "foo", "bar" ],
263                 hehe => sub { join(" ",(@_,"!!!")) },
264                 ignored => "",
265         }
266
267         The entry for "laughter" will become as follows after processing:
268
269         "laughter" => {
270                 haha => "ha ha ah",
271                 hoho => "ho haho",
272                 hehe => "hehe !!!",
273                 ignored => ""
274         }
275
276 [2] OpenSSL is built with threading capabilities unless the user
277     specifies 'no-threads'.  The value of the key 'thread_scheme' may
278     be "(unknown)", in which case the user MUST give some compilation
279     flags to Configure.
280
281 [3] OpenSSL has three types of things to link from object files or
282     static libraries:
283
284     - shared libraries; that would be libcrypto and libssl.
285     - shared objects (sometimes called dynamic libraries);  that would
286       be the engines.
287     - applications; those are apps/openssl and all the test apps.
288
289     Very roughly speaking, linking is done like this (words in braces
290     represent the configuration settings documented at the beginning
291     of this file):
292
293     shared libraries:
294         {ld} $(CFLAGS) {shared_ldflag} -shared -o libfoo.so \
295             -Wl,--whole-archive libfoo.a -Wl,--no-whole-archive \
296             {plib_lflags} -lcrypto {ex_libs}
297
298     shared objects:
299         {ld} $(CFLAGS) {shared_ldflag} -shared -o libeng.so \
300             blah1.o blah2.o {plib_lflags} -lcrypto {ex_libs}
301
302     applications:
303         {ld} $(CFLAGS) {lflags} -o app \
304             app1.o utils.o {plib_lflags} -lssl -lcrypto {ex_libs}
305
306
307 Historically, the target configurations came in form of a string with
308 values separated by colons.  This use is deprecated.  The string form
309 looked like this:
310
311    "target" => "{cc}:{cflags}:{unistd}:{thread_cflag}:{sys_id}:{lflags}:{bn_ops}:{cpuid_obj}:{bn_obj}:{ec_obj}:{des_obj}:{aes_obj}:{bf_obj}:{md5_obj}:{sha1_obj}:{cast_obj}:{rc4_obj}:{rmd160_obj}:{rc5_obj}:{wp_obj}:{cmll_obj}:{modes_obj}:{padlock_obj}:{perlasm_scheme}:{dso_scheme}:{shared_target}:{shared_cflag}:{shared_ldflag}:{shared_extension}:{ranlib}:{arflags}:{multilib}"
312
313
314 Build info files
315 ================
316
317 The build.info files that are spread over the source tree contain the
318 minimum information needed to build and distribute OpenSSL.  It uses a
319 simple and yet fairly powerful language to determine what needs to be
320 built, from what sources, and other relationships between files.
321
322 For every build.info file, all file references are relative to the
323 directory of the build.info file for source files, and the
324 corresponding build directory for built files if the build tree
325 differs from the source tree.
326
327 When processed, every line is processed with the perl module
328 Text::Template, using the delimiters "{-" and "-}".  The hashes
329 %config and %target are passed to the perl fragments, along with
330 $sourcedir and $builddir, which are the locations of the source
331 directory for the current build.info file and the corresponding build
332 directory, all relative to the top of the build tree.
333
334 To begin with, things to be built are declared by setting specific
335 variables:
336
337     PROGRAMS=foo bar
338     LIBS=libsomething
339     ENGINES=libeng
340     SCRIPTS=myhack
341     EXTRA=file1 file2
342
343 Note that the files mentioned for PROGRAMS, LIBS and ENGINES *must* be
344 without extensions.  The build file templates will figure them out.
345
346 For each thing to be built, it is then possible to say what sources
347 they are built from:
348
349     PROGRAMS=foo bar
350     SOURCE[foo]=foo.c common.c
351     SOURCE[bar]=bar.c extra.c common.c
352
353 It's also possible to tell some other dependencies:
354
355     DEPEND[foo]=libsomething
356     DEPEND[libbar]=libsomethingelse
357
358 (it could be argued that 'libsomething' and 'libsomethingelse' are
359 source as well.  However, the files given through SOURCE are expected
360 to be located in the source tree while files given through DEPEND are
361 expected to be located in the build tree)
362
363 It's also possible to depend on static libraries explicitely:
364
365     DEPEND[foo]=libsomething.a
366     DEPEND[libbar]=libsomethingelse.a
367
368 This should be rarely used, and care should be taken to make sure it's
369 only used when supported.  For example, native Windows build doesn't
370 support build static libraries and DLLs at the same time, so using
371 static libraries on Windows can only be done when configured
372 'no-shared'.
373
374 For some libraries, we maintain files with public symbols and their
375 slot in a transfer vector (important on some platforms).  It can be
376 declared like this:
377
378     ORDINALS[libcrypto]=crypto
379
380 The value is not the name of the file in question, but rather the
381 argument to util/mkdef.pl that indicates which file to use.
382
383 One some platforms, shared libraries come with a name that's different
384 from their static counterpart.  That's declared as follows:
385
386     SHARED_NAME[libfoo]=cygfoo-{- $config{shlibver} -}
387
388 The example is from Cygwin, which has a required naming convention.
389
390 Sometimes, it makes sense to rename an output file, for example a
391 library:
392
393     RENAME[libfoo]=libbar
394
395 That lines has "libfoo" get renamed to "libbar".  While it makes no
396 sense at all to just have a rename like that (why not just use
397 "libbar" everywhere?), it does make sense when it can be used
398 conditionally.  See a little further below for an example.
399
400 In some cases, it's desirable to include some source files in the
401 shared form of a library only:
402
403     SHARED_SOURCE[libfoo]=dllmain.c
404
405 For any file to be built, it's also possible to tell what extra
406 include paths the build of their source files should use:
407
408     INCLUDE[foo]=include
409
410 In some cases, one might want to generate some source files from
411 others, that's done as follows:
412
413     GENERATE[foo.s]=asm/something.pl $(CFLAGS)
414     GENERATE[bar.s]=asm/bar.S
415
416 The value of each GENERATE line is a command line or part of it.
417 Configure places no rules on the command line, except the the first
418 item muct be the generator file.  It is, however, entirely up to the
419 build file template to define exactly how those command lines should
420 be handled, how the output is captured and so on.
421
422 Sometimes, the generator file itself depends on other files, for
423 example if it is a perl script that depends on other perl modules.
424 This can be expressed using DEPEND like this:
425
426     DEPEND[asm/something.pl]=../perlasm/Foo.pm
427
428 There may also be cases where the exact file isn't easily specified,
429 but an inclusion directory still needs to be specified.  INCLUDE can
430 be used in that case:
431
432     INCLUDE[asm/something.pl]=../perlasm
433
434 NOTE: GENERATE lines are limited to one command only per GENERATE.
435
436 As a last resort, it's possible to have raw build file lines, between
437 BEGINRAW and ENDRAW lines as follows:
438
439     BEGINRAW[Makefile(unix)]
440     haha.h: {- $builddir -}/Makefile
441         echo "/* haha */" > haha.h
442     ENDRAW[Makefile(unix)]
443
444 The word within square brackets is the build_file configuration item
445 or the build_file configuration item followed by the second word in the
446 build_scheme configuration item for the configured target within
447 parenthesis as shown above.  For example, with the following relevant
448 configuration items:
449
450    build_file   => "build.ninja"
451    build_scheme => [ "unified", "unix" ]
452
453 ... these lines will be considered:
454
455    BEGINRAW[build.ninja]
456    build haha.h: echo "/* haha */" > haha.h
457    ENDRAW[build.ninja]
458
459    BEGINRAW[build.ninja(unix)]
460    build hoho.h: echo "/* hoho */" > hoho.h
461    ENDRAW[build.ninja(unix)]
462
463 Should it be needed because the recipes within a RAW section might
464 clash with those generated by Configure, it's possible to tell it
465 not to generate them with the use of OVERRIDES, for example:
466
467     SOURCE[libfoo]=foo.c bar.c
468     
469     OVERRIDES=bar.o
470     BEGINRAW[Makefile(unix)]
471     bar.o: bar.c
472         $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -DSPECIAL -c -o $@ $<
473     ENDRAW[Makefile(unix)]
474
475 See the documentation further up for more information on configuration
476 items.
477
478 Finally, you can have some simple conditional use of the build.info
479 information, looking like this:
480
481     IF[1]
482      something
483     ELSIF[2]
484      something other
485     ELSE
486      something else
487     ENDIF
488
489 The expression in square brackets is interpreted as a string in perl,
490 and will be seen as true if perl thinks it is, otherwise false.  For
491 example, the above would have "something" used, since 1 is true.
492
493 Together with the use of Text::Template, this can be used as
494 conditions based on something in the passed variables, for example:
495
496     IF[{- $disabled{shared} -}]
497       LIBS=libcrypto
498       SOURCE[libcrypto]=...
499     ELSE
500       LIBS=libfoo
501       SOURCE[libfoo]=...
502     ENDIF
503
504 or:
505
506     # VMS has a cultural standard where all libraries are prefixed.
507     # For OpenSSL, the choice is 'ossl_'
508     IF[{- $config{target} =~ /^vms/ -}]
509      RENAME[libcrypto]=ossl_libcrypto
510      RENAME[libssl]=ossl_libssl
511     ENDIF
512
513
514 Build-file programming with the "unified" build system
515 ======================================================
516
517 "Build files" are called "Makefile" on Unix-like operating systems,
518 "descrip.mms" for MMS on VMS, "makefile" for nmake on Windows, etc.
519
520 To use the "unified" build system, the target configuration needs to
521 set the three items 'build_scheme', 'build_file' and 'build_command'.
522 In the rest of this section, we will assume that 'build_scheme' is set
523 to "unified" (see the configurations documentation above for the
524 details).
525
526 For any name given by 'build_file', the "unified" system expects a
527 template file in Configurations/ named like the build file, with
528 ".tmpl" appended, or in case of possible ambiguity, a combination of
529 the second 'build_scheme' list item and the 'build_file' name.  For
530 example, if 'build_file' is set to "Makefile", the template could be
531 Configurations/Makefile.tmpl or Configurations/unix-Makefile.tmpl.
532 In case both Configurations/unix-Makefile.tmpl and
533 Configurations/Makefile.tmpl are present, the former takes
534 precedence.
535
536 The build-file template is processed with the perl module
537 Text::Template, using "{-" and "-}" as delimiters that enclose the
538 perl code fragments that generate configuration-dependent content.
539 Those perl fragments have access to all the hash variables from
540 configdata.pem.
541
542 The build-file template is expected to define at least the following
543 perl functions in a perl code fragment enclosed with "{-" and "-}".
544 They are all expected to return a string with the lines they produce.
545
546     generatesrc - function that produces build file lines to generate
547                   a source file from some input.
548
549                   It's called like this:
550
551                         generatesrc(src => "PATH/TO/tobegenerated",
552                                     generator => [ "generatingfile", ... ]
553                                     generator_incs => [ "INCL/PATH", ... ]
554                                     generator_deps => [ "dep1", ... ]
555                                     generator => [ "generatingfile", ... ]
556                                     incs => [ "INCL/PATH", ... ],
557                                     deps => [ "dep1", ... ],
558                                     intent => one of "libs", "dso", "bin" );
559
560                   'src' has the name of the file to be generated.
561                   'generator' is the command or part of command to
562                   generate the file, of which the first item is
563                   expected to be the file to generate from.
564                   generatesrc() is expected to analyse and figure out
565                   exactly how to apply that file and how to capture
566                   the result.  'generator_incs' and 'generator_deps'
567                   are include directories and files that the generator
568                   file itself depends on.  'incs' and 'deps' are
569                   include directories and files that are used if $(CC)
570                   is used as an intermediary step when generating the
571                   end product (the file indicated by 'src').  'intent'
572                   indicates what the generated file is going to be
573                   used for.
574
575     src2obj     - function that produces build file lines to build an
576                   object file from source files and associated data.
577
578                   It's called like this:
579
580                         src2obj(obj => "PATH/TO/objectfile",
581                                 srcs => [ "PATH/TO/sourcefile", ... ],
582                                 deps => [ "dep1", ... ],
583                                 incs => [ "INCL/PATH", ... ]
584                                 intent => one of "lib", "dso", "bin" );
585
586                   'obj' has the intended object file *without*
587                   extension, src2obj() is expected to add that.
588                   'srcs' has the list of source files to build the
589                   object file, with the first item being the source
590                   file that directly corresponds to the object file.
591                   'deps' is a list of explicit dependencies.  'incs'
592                   is a list of include file directories.  Finally,
593                   'intent' indicates what this object file is going
594                   to be used for.
595
596     obj2lib     - function that produces build file lines to build a
597                   static library file ("libfoo.a" in Unix terms) from
598                   object files.
599
600                   called like this:
601
602                         obj2lib(lib => "PATH/TO/libfile",
603                                 objs => [ "PATH/TO/objectfile", ... ]);
604
605                   'lib' has the intended library file name *without*
606                   extension, obj2lib is expected to add that.  'objs'
607                   has the list of object files (also *without*
608                   extension) to build this library.
609
610     libobj2shlib - function that produces build file lines to build a
611                   shareable object library file ("libfoo.so" in Unix
612                   terms) from the corresponding static library file
613                   or object files.
614
615                   called like this:
616
617                         libobj2shlib(shlib => "PATH/TO/shlibfile",
618                                      lib => "PATH/TO/libfile",
619                                      objs => [ "PATH/TO/objectfile", ... ],
620                                      deps => [ "PATH/TO/otherlibfile", ... ],
621                                      ordinals => [ "word", "/PATH/TO/ordfile" ]);
622
623                   'lib' has the intended library file name *without*
624                   extension, libobj2shlib is expected to add that.
625                   'shlib' has the corresponding shared library name
626                   *without* extension.  'deps' has the list of other
627                   libraries (also *without* extension) this library
628                   needs to be linked with.  'objs' has the list of
629                   object files (also *without* extension) to build
630                   this library.  'ordinals' MAY be present, and when
631                   it is, its value is an array where the word is
632                   "crypto" or "ssl" and the file is one of the ordinal
633                   files util/libeay.num or util/ssleay.num in the
634                   source directory.
635
636                   This function has a choice; it can use the
637                   corresponding static library as input to make the
638                   shared library, or the list of object files.
639
640     obj2dso     - function that produces build file lines to build a
641                   dynamic shared object file from object files.
642
643                   called like this:
644
645                         obj2dso(lib => "PATH/TO/libfile",
646                                 objs => [ "PATH/TO/objectfile", ... ],
647                                 deps => [ "PATH/TO/otherlibfile",
648                                 ... ]);
649
650                   This is almost the same as libobj2shlib, but the
651                   intent is to build a shareable library that can be
652                   loaded in runtime (a "plugin"...).  The differences
653                   are subtle, one of the most visible ones is that the
654                   resulting shareable library is produced from object
655                   files only.
656
657     obj2bin     - function that produces build file lines to build an
658                   executable file from object files.
659
660                   called like this:
661
662                         obj2bin(bin => "PATH/TO/binfile",
663                                 objs => [ "PATH/TO/objectfile", ... ],
664                                 deps => [ "PATH/TO/libfile", ... ]);
665
666                   'bin' has the intended executable file name
667                   *without* extension, obj2bin is expected to add
668                   that.  'objs' has the list of object files (also
669                   *without* extension) to build this library.  'deps'
670                   has the list of library files (also *without*
671                   extension) that the programs needs to be linked
672                   with.
673
674     in2script   - function that produces build file lines to build a
675                   script file from some input.
676
677                   called like this:
678
679                         in2script(script => "PATH/TO/scriptfile",
680                                   sources => [ "PATH/TO/infile", ... ]);
681
682                   'script' has the intended script file name.
683                   'sources' has the list of source files to build the
684                   resulting script from.
685
686 In all cases, file file paths are relative to the build tree top, and
687 the build file actions run with the build tree top as current working
688 directory.
689
690 Make sure to end the section with these functions with a string that
691 you thing is appropriate for the resulting build file.  If nothing
692 else, end it like this:
693
694       "";       # Make sure no lingering values end up in the Makefile
695     -}
696
697
698 Configure helper scripts
699 ========================
700
701 Configure uses helper scripts in this directory:
702
703 Checker scripts
704 ---------------
705
706 These scripts are per platform family, to check the integrity of the
707 tools used for configuration and building.  The checker script used is
708 either {build_platform}-{build_file}-checker.pm or
709 {build_platform}-checker.pm, where {build_platform} is the second
710 'build_scheme' list element from the configuration target data, and
711 {build_file} is 'build_file' from the same target data.
712
713 If the check succeeds, the script is expected to end with a non-zero
714 expression.  If the check fails, the script can end with a zero, or
715 with a `die`.